Special Topics for Spring 2018

Special Topics 

Please note: this page will be updated as information is confirmed. In case of a discrepancy between this page and myEC, the information on myEC will be deemed correct.

  • Additional information on these courses is available at https://myec.ecuad.ca/
  • Most credit courses have prerequisites that are clearly outlined on the website.

Spring 2018

AHIS 333 S001 S002 S003 – Interdisciplinary Forums (3)

Wednesdays, 4:30 pm – 6:10 pm, 6:30 pm – 7:20 pm Spring 2018

Instructor: Jamie Hilder

Topic: Thinking through Elders

This class will engage with elders, broadly defined, to consider how knowledge is kept, cared for, and sustained through bodies that have strong links to various communities. Lectures and readings will be paired with visits from artists, archivists, and activists who either occupy the position of elder or have a significant relationship to elders. Since just being old doesn’t make one an elder, along the way we’ll try to determine which characteristics, priorities, and behaviours determine one’s role as an elder. In doing so, we’ll bump up against structures of knowledge production in our institutional lives, and think through our expectations for ourselves, our fellow students and instructors, and our communities in an expanded field of learning.

AHIS 336 S001 – Hist. + Contemporary Movements (3)

Wednesdays, 8:30 am – 11:20 am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Dr. Ariane Noël de Tilly

Topic: Art and Revolution

This special topic course will focus on the role and function of art during a number of revolutions since the French Revolution, including the Russian Revolution, the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, the Algerian Revolution, and the Chinese Cultural Revolution. One of the aims of this course is to further understand how the revolutionaries, counter-revolutionaries and/or artists defined the role of art during these periods of revolutionary upheavals. Over the course of the semester, we will look at the different types of works produced in the context of these revolutions, from paintings to caricatures, from propaganda posters to films.

AHIS 430 S001 – Topics in Cont Aboriginal Art (3)

Wednesdays, 4:30 pm – 7:20 pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Richard Hill

Topic: Modern & Contemporary Aboriginal Art in the Press

This seminar will look at the public reception of key Indigenous artists and exhibitions through their coverage in mainstream newspapers and magazines. We will look at art and exhibitions as they are available to us in surviving documents and literatures (images, artists statements, exhibition catalogues) and compare our sense of these projects with their reception by the mainstream press. We will compare and contrast theoretical frameworks and methods of analysis as well as content, with the hope of tracking not only how these differ in general, but also over time, since the mid-20th Century. A key question will be: have some of the avant-garde ideas about Aboriginal art first propounded in the 20th Century become mainstream?

CCID 202 S001H + CCID 302 S001H – Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Thursdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Zoe Kreye

Topic: Spaces of Belonging

In our ever-changing society we can experience inspiring multiplicities as well as the challenges of dislocation. This course provides a forum for the university and its students to explore issues of belonging, particularly informed by migration and immigration. The goal of this course is for students to learn how art can be used to challenge the dynamics of difference, and foster agency in negotiating spaces of belonging.

We will use art as a vehicle to unpack the complexity of displacement, diy underground culture, community organizing, non-profits, migration, immigration, development, public space, and the body. Through a somatic lens we will work towards embodying politics, theory and politics rather than approaching topics from a purely academic or dominant intellectual perspective. Referencing students’ own experiences, local community relations and national politics, students will research and produce projects that investigate home, 'integration', social isolation, attachment, embodiment and community building. We will work with array of visiting artist and speakers as well as working closely with MOSAIC (settlement organization serving immigrant, newcomer and refugees).

This course counts towards the SPACE minor but is open and relevant to all majors: film/video, media, design, studio arts, illustration, photography, critical studies. Social Practice and Community Engagement (SPACE) focuses on nuance, experimentation and making things happen. It looks within and beyond the tradition of art as an object and proposes human relations as the material for art making. You will gain interdisciplinary skills towards your chosen major: idea development, embodied design, creative research, community cooperation, ethics, collaboration skills, conflict mediation and short/long-term project planning.

CCID 202 S002 – Fieldwork: Special Topics (3)

Fridays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Jake Chakasim, Sadira Rodrigues, Sanem Guvenc-Salgirli

Topic: Critical Research, Methods + Practices

This course is concerned with the meeting of critical theory and contemporary creative practices in their most expansive forms. Driven by methodological approaches that interrogate a range of cultural, geographic and historical perspectives, Research Methods|Research Practice combines research-led and problem oriented teaching with fieldwork and site-driven projects. Meeting every Tuesday and Friday, the course will engage with a range of ideas from artist-led research and aleatory procedures to structuralism and semiotics, from memory and intersectional studies to new materialisms and spatial cultures. Driven by indigenous and decolonizing pedagogical principles, this course aims to provide students a solid basis for critical making / thinking and cultural inquiry that is relevant to the contemporary world. Led by a team of multi-disciplinary teachers, the course merges theoretical / conceptual inquiry with weekly off-site fieldwork, allowing students to create their own practice-based projects based on site research, cultural context, and independent studio work related to the ideas we explore in the course.

IMPORTANT NOTE: CCID 202 S002 and HUMN 205 S002 are linked, so you must have taken both in the Fall 2017 semester, and then sign up for both in the Spring 2018 semester.

CCID 202 S030F + CCID 302 S030F – Social Practice + Community Engagement (3)

Hybrid course – online plus one week in-class

Tuesday, February 13 to Saturday, February 17, 9am-12pm and 1pm-4pm, Spring 2017

Instructor: Zach Camozzi + Jaymie Johnson

Topic: Habitat Response

Participants in this class will step into a Vancouver-wide community art project, As the Crow Flies, centered on crows and bird habitat, and under this umbrella project will address the broadened theme of habitats. Through readings, field trips, guest speakers, material inquiry, and independent studio work sessions, students will explore the topic of Habitat Response with attention to native and invasive species and our perceptions of and relationships with nature. Students will have the opportunity to work on an active community art project while developing their own project proposal and/or prototype.

The 5 day intensive period in February will include field trips, guest speakers, introduction to working with natural materials, studio work sessions, and critiques. This will be book-ended with a month beforehand of readings and observation exercises and a month following of individualized research, material inquiry, and project proposal development to result in a final prototype or proposal for a social practice or community-engaged work that responds to the theme Habitat in an environmentally sensitive and locally relevant way.

This class is open to artists and designers in all mediums. Students should have an interest in the broad notion of Habitat, and an interest in environmental issues, our local ecosystems and our general relationship with nature.

CCID 301 S002D – Social Practice + Community Engagement (3)

Thursdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Sandra Semchuk

Topic: In Wildness Everywhere
This course will bring together Photography and Culture + Community students to open up possibilities for understanding audiences and how one's own practice participates in and creates community with one another, with other communities, across species and with the inanimate. Beginning with the idea of "in wildness everywhere" (Harmon and Semchuk) students will look into their practices and specific concerns to consider how the unexpected, synchronicity, reciprocity, performance, play, breath and meditation influence and shape their inquiry and work to discover new audiences and forms for communication. This course will take us off site. Students will create a body of work, individually or collaboratively and will include awareness of new audiences. Events will be created in situ by students. 

COMD 350 S001 – Topics in Communication Design (3)

Fridays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Jon Hannan

Topic: Independent Publishing

This course will take a collaborative approach to the creation of publications, while emphasizing and encouraging other entrepreneurial behavior. It will challenge you to think about how we begin to articulate and document practice, while also questioning the role that art and design has to play in not only delivering visual content, but also in persuading an audience about the viability of a project. There has never been a better time to self-publish. Titles proliferate on almost any subject you care to think about and often there are a range of approaches to popular subjects aimed at smaller or niche audiences. Social networking and mobile devices offer a range of opportunities for extending the brand of a publication and delivering content in ways that are no longer limited to the printed page.

CRAM 204 S001N Ceramics: Special Topics (3)

CRAM 304 S001N + CRAM 304 S002N

Fridays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: D’Arcy Margesson

Topics: Tableware

Course description: This course will allow students to explore the use of the potter’s wheel along with different hand building techniques to complete a table setting of their own design. Students will follow a set of planned projects, that will allow them to develop and improve their skill levels, in order to facilitate the realization of their tableware design. The instructor will work on both a group and individual level to facilitate the communication of individual concerns and ideas.

CRAM 303 S001M Ceramics Practices: Topic (6)

INDD 330 S001M Ceramics: Advanced (6)

Wednesdays, 8:30am – 3:50pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Justin Novak

Topic: Dialogues with Ceramics

This course offers the opportunity for students to develop research-driven studio work that explores the medium of ceramics within a range of contemporary art and design practices. Fueled by critical inquiry as well as studio experimentation, students will engage in the development, articulation and pursuit of their own research questions. They will learn advanced technical skills related to completing projects and they will develop a critical framework and vocabulary to support their process. Each weekly meeting will begin with a demonstration of advanced techniques and methods, followed by one-on-one and/or group discussions of studio projects and the sharing of individual research. 

HUMN 205 S001U Perspectives in the Crit. (3)

Mondays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Cissie Fu

Topic: Interactivity + New Media

This media history and theory course will cover the work and ideas of artists and designers who have explored new interactive and interdisciplinary forms alongside engineers and mathematicians who have developed information technologies against the backdrop of influential scientific and philosophical ideologies pertinent to the evolution of interactivity and new media. Student will study seminal art and design movements and genres--such as Brecht's epic theatre, the Futurists, the Bauhaus, Fluxus, kinetic sculptures, Dada, conceptual art, video and art electronic theatre--to appreciate (recognise both the worth and implications) of emerging digital arts and their aesthetics, strategies, and socio-cultural æffects. By providing the intellectual and critical contexts for practices of interactivity in art, design, and media, this course will, ultimately, call forth a dynamic dialogue with those technologies and human-machine paradigms that have come to define today's digital interactive medium.

HUMN 205 S002 Perspectives in the Crit. (3)

Tuesdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Sanem Guvenc-Salgirli, Jake Chakasim, Sadira Rodrigues

Topic: Critical Research, Methods + Practices

This course is concerned with the meeting of critical theory and contemporary creative practices in their most expansive forms. Driven by methodological approaches that interrogate a range of cultural, geographic and historical perspectives, Research Methods|Research Practice combines research-led and problem oriented teaching with fieldwork and site-driven projects. Meeting every Tuesday and Friday, the course will engage with a range of ideas from artist-led research and aleatory procedures to structuralism and semiotics, from memory and intersectional studies to new materialisms and spatial cultures. Driven by indigenous and decolonizing pedagogical principles, this course aims to provide students a solid basis for critical making / thinking and cultural inquiry that is relevant to the contemporary world. Led by a team of multi-disciplinary teachers, the course merges theoretical / conceptual inquiry with weekly off-site fieldwork, allowing students to create their own practice-based projects based on site research, cultural context, and independent studio work related to the ideas we explore in the course.

IMPORTANT NOTE: HUMN 205 S002 and CCID 202 S002 are linked, so you must have taken both in the Fall 2017 semester, and then sign up for both in the Spring 2018 semester.

HUMN 305 S001 Studies in the Humanities (3) 

Tuesdays, 8:30am-11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Julie Andreyev

Topic: More-than-human Creativity 

Creativity is a part of the day-to-day flourishing of all beings. Both human and other beings creatively problem-solve, produce knowledge and meaning, communicate with others, and play. Human creativity is often generated in relation to other life forms; throughout history, plants and animals have played a central role in how meaning is made in human cultures. The course will examine how representations of other life forms generate meaning and knowledge, and how the physical involvement of other living beings in creative processes have consequences for both humans and for the other beings. The course includes readings from a range of creative disciplines, such as art, speculative fiction, ecopoetics, philosophy, indigenous thought, biology, anthropology and critical theory. Students are asked to consider: in what ways can creative processes contribute care-full models of being-in-relation with other life and our shared ecologies? The course will include lectures and readings, and students will participate in discussions, presentations and in the production of a paper or project.

HUMN 305 S002 Studies in the Humanities (3) 

Wednesdays, 4:30pm-7:20pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Chris Ewart

Topic: Projecting Disability in Narrative, Art and Experience

This course allows students to engage personally, creatively and critically with disability in our cultural material. Through a range of contemporary fiction, film, art and performance we will investigate moments of disability agency and resistance to ableism. Understanding disability theory – including how normalcy and able-bodiedness operate in compulsory fashion, how disability and the disabled figure function in narrative, and how disability brings an important, often-overlooked aesthetic to art and culture – will help us situate the sociocultural importance of our work, our experiences and the experiences of others in equitable ways.

HUMN 305 S090 Studies in the Humanities (3) 

Online course, Spring 2018

Instructor: Aaron Peck

Topic: "Image, Process, Text"

This course will study three books in depth. In all three cases, the writers engage with literature and visual culture, through commonplace found images, cinema, painting, or contemporary art. We will consider these three books in relationship to the words outlined in our course's title. How does each writer think about text, images, or process? The goal of this class is to help you all become better writers, particularly in relationship to art, photography, design, and cinema. Our three texts are Julien Gracq's book-length essay Reading Writing, W. G. Sebald's novel Rings of Saturn, and Lynne Tillman's collection of essays and interviews What Would Lynne Tillman Do?. These books not only explore the questions set out by this course, but they also offer rich sources and references, places to learn about many other writers, artists, thinkers, and filmmakers. Our reading of these three texts will be accompanied by theoretical readings of W J T Mitchell's Picture Theory, to help us theorize and contextualize the books we're reading. 

HUMN 306 S030 Studies in the Humanities: Design (3)

Hybrid course – online plus one week in-class

Tuesday, February 13 to Saturday, February 17, 9am-12pm and 1pm-4pm, Spring 2017

Instructor: Craig Badke

Topic: Design Intensive – Design as a Critical Medium

This 5 day intensive workshop serves as a research and design laboratory for students from across Emily Carr to work on a single theme. The workshop explores design as a medium through which we can instigate critical discussion and debate while encouraging more active forms of intervention and agency.

HUMN 311 S002 Visual Art Seminar (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Mimi Gellman

Topic: Decolonial Aesthetics

Decolonial Aesthetics will explore and link decolonization strategies and aesthetics with the aim of learning to think and see “otherwise.” Through presentations, readings, discussions and art-making we will consider the aesthetic perspectives and philosophies of non-western cultures and explore strategies to decolonize our own lenses. Cree scholar Winona Wheeler explains that decolonization entails, “developing a critical consciousness about the causes of oppression, the distortion of our history, our own collaboration and the degrees to which we have internalized colonialist ideas and practices.”

The course will also investigate Indigenous aesthetic realms. The significance of imparting concepts of Indigenous aesthetics to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars has consequences that extend far beyond the aesthetic realm of cultural production.

The class will begin with theoretical readings and written responses. For the final project, the students will be tasked with creating an artwork that demonstrates a decolonized mind, practice or approach.

Note: Students erolling in HUMN 311 S002 must also enroll in VAST 310 S001 Visual Arts: Special Topics

ILUS 208 S001 - Illustration Process: Topic (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Anna Firth

Topic: The Animated Image

In this introductory illustration course, students will explore narrative and ideation through time-based imagery. This will range from sequential images to alternative comics to simple animated approaches. Students will consider intersections between illustration and experimental animation. Technical instruction will include, pen & ink approaches, storyboarding, bookmaking and Photoshop practices. No previous technical skills required. 

ILUS 208 S002 - Illustration Process: Topics

Mondays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Michael Markowsky

Topic: The Figure in Action

Film and animation can capture and simulate movement, but how do artists, illustrators, and designers convey movement and the passing of time in still images? We will research, explore and describe the dynamics of the human body, as well as it's(our) relationship to the landscape and architecture. Classes will include examining the six different types of narrative art, three life model drawing sessions, and more experimental exercises including drawing outside, drawing in public and drawing while in motion. The ultimate goal is to develop the ability to draw quickly with precision and confidence.

The human body and other active/static forms (cars, plants, space aliens, etc.), will be examined in and from different points of view (illusionistic perspective), spaces (settings/atmospheres), states (mental/physical), textures (nude/draped), times (specific historical moment(s)), speeds (rest/action) and theoretical frameworks (philosophical/critical/political positions).

Students will complete spontaneous, short activities, as well as multiple interconnected projects; culminating in a final sequential/narrative artwork that demonstrates their learning and understanding of human anatomy, various approaches to form rendering, as well as positive and negative space.

Students will be required to read a selection of texts related to the subject and discuss them in class. Genres and mediums discussed in class will include painting, drawing, illustration, comic books, video games, manga, graphic novels, children's books, package design, instruction manuals, maps, diagrams, storyboards, photography, film, video art, etc.

ILUS 305 S001 – Illustration Genres: Topic (3)

Wednesdays, 4:30pm – 7:20pm

Instructor: Miriam Libicki

Topic: Narrative Nonfiction

When artists interpret real-life issues visually, the results can change the course of history and the "global conversation." We will analyze illustrators who turned research and observation into powerful visual communucation, from Francisco Goya (The Disasters of War) to Kabi Nagata (My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness). Students will rigorously research and create their own sequential art (picture book, comic/manga, art book, etc.) about an issue or true story they want to shed light on.

ILUS 306 S001 - Illustration Practices: Topic (6)

Wednesdays, 8:30am – 3:50pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Dan Starling

Topic: Revisiting Narratives

In this course students will investigate strategies to generate unique narrative storytelling concepts and of creating accompanying visual images. Through short assignments and in-class drawing, students will be encouraged to create work that speaks criticality to a history of image production and to integrate this knowledge creatively into their work. The course will provide an opportunity for depicting, illustrating and interpreting narrative ideas as part of building a self-directed narrative project. Projects can range from comics, graphic novels, artist books, picture books to conceptually-based gallery and installation approaches.

INDD 350 S001 Special Topics in Industrial Design (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Keith Doyle

Topic: New Craft

This three-credit elective course focuses on contemporary topics in Industrial Design. Students will undertake immersive educational experiences that expand their skills and understanding of the discipline. Previous projects have included cross-cultural design, iterative prototyping, patterning and hacking of textile products, the design of smart objects, and critical making. 

Industrial Design is a broad field touching on a wide range of methods, techniques and processes. The discipline itself has its roots in the 18th & 19th centuries – directly linked to emergent mass production, mass industrialization and mechanization. Simultaneously, Arts & Crafts emerged as a political will opposed to this de-humanizing mass industrialization. Over the last half-century, industrial design has evolved as a process integrating traditional crafts (knowledge) and industrial mass-production techniques to emerge as a multi-faceted discipline integrating people, manufacturing and material practice (making), ecological concerns, sustainability, social agency and change.

On the occasion of the International 2016 XXIT Triennale di Milano, the Exposition halls of the Fabbrica del Vapore hosted ‘New Craft’. The exhibition offered a broad view of over 500 manufacturing applications provided by more than 30 countries around the world. Each exhibit was unique in offering a determined view of Craft in the 21st century. We are witnessing a revolution in access to technology that is influencing and transforming our ways of producing, our ways of consuming and above all, our ways of designing. In this course, we will reflect on the proposition of a new craft, one of industry, arts, and traditional craft. We will explore local and contemporary forms of New Craft through survey, short-lecture, guest speakers and in-studio experimentation.

MHIS 207 S001U Interactivity + New Media (3)

Mondays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: TBA

Topic: Interactivity + New Media

This media history and theory course will cover the work and ideas of artists and designers who have explored new interactive and interdisciplinary forms alongside engineers and mathematicians who have developed information technologies against the backdrop of influential scientific and philosophical ideologies pertinent to the evolution of interactivity and new media. Student will study seminal art and design movements and genres--such as Brecht's epic theatre, the Futurists, the Bauhaus, Fluxus, kinetic sculptures, Dada, conceptual art, video and art electronic theatre--to appreciate (recognise both the worth and implications) of emerging digital arts and their aesthetics, strategies, and socio-cultural æffects. By providing the intellectual and critical contexts for practices of interactivity in art, design, and media, this course will, ultimately, call forth a dynamic dialogue with those technologies and human-machine paradigms that have come to define today's digital interactive medium.

MHIS 429 S001 Topics in Film/Video Theory

Thursdays, 12:30pm – 3:20pm

Instructor: Dr. Ariane Noël de Tilly

Topic: Cities in Films

The birth of cinema took place at a moment when more and more people left rural settings to establish themselves in urban centers. Since the late 19th century, filmmakers have made films that witness the tremendous growth of cities and how people have contributed and responded to the significant changes that took place in cities around the world. Following a chronological, geographical and thematic structure, the course will address topics such as urban modernity, cities in ruins, and virtual cities. This course will take us to different cities around the world (Berlin, Paris, Dakar, New York, Buenos Aires, Hong Kong, Taipei, Vancouver, etc.) and will give us an opportunity to reflect on how filmmakers have documented, depicted, or imagined city life. The films shown in this course will include a broad range of genres, from experimental film to science-fiction, from drama to auteur cinema.  

PHOT 306 S001 – Special Topics in Photography (3)

Mondays, 4:30pm– 7:20pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Jonathan Middleton

Topic: The Photobook

The photobook operates as polyvalent sub-category of art publication, acting simultaneously as document, archive, exhibition space, distribution vehicle, artist multiple, and sculpture, among other roles. This course offers both practical and theoretical approaches to the photobook as an extension of the artist book and monograph. The class will make use of the books in ECUAD library’s Artists' Book collection and other resources as points of conversation. Students will learn a number of common print and production methods used in book publishing, and be asked to think critically about what techniques, genres, and design considerations are most pertinent to their own practices.

PNTG 315 S001 Painting Practices: Topic (6)

Wednesdays, 1pm – 7:20pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Ingrid Koenig

Topic: What It’s Like to Be a Painting

In this topics-based course students develop self-directed works that investigate forces and hidden dynamics of painting, beginning with generative processes, followed through with strategies such as expansion, riffing, exchange, bridging, and substitution. A conceptual lens for the course includes materializations of thinking, perception and affect in painting.

PRNT 307 S001 Print Media Practices: Topics (6)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 3:20pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Beth Howe

Topic: Letterpress Printing

The history of printed matter depends on the practice of letterpress printing. For 500 years, typography, illustration, printmaking and written language all came together on the press bed in the production of books, images, broadsides, posters, song sheets, newspapers, magazines, advertisements, and ephemera.
This course will introduce students to methods of letterpress printing: hand-setting moveable type, producing image blocks, ‘locking-up’ the material on the press and printing runs of posters, chap books, cards and other printed matter.
The course will consider the implications of mass-production and dissemination and how the means of communication, historical and contemporary, shape our public discussion.

SCIE 300 S001 Studies in the Sciences (3)

Fridays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Sanem Guvenc-Salgirli

Topic: The Design of Disease

Poisons, pills, corpses, gravediggers, miraculous cures, epidemics, sorcerers… History of medicine is one big ensemble that incorporates all these and more.  This strange and varied history is at the same time entangled with various practices of design: from the architecture of medical and mental institutions to early visualizations of diseases and human anatomy, from X-Rays and MRIs to computer generated imagery in films and TV series. 
Why is history of disease also the history of humanity? Why do we think of pain through metaphors?  How can poison be a cure as well?  How do representations of diseases affect the way we perceive the world?  Through these questions (and many more!) this course is designed to give the students a sneak peak into the history and anthropology of medicine through a discussion of a wide range of diseases, treatments, and cures. 

SCLP 312 S001 Sculpture: Special Topics (3)

Mondays, 1:00pm – 3:50pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Jen Weih

Topic: Public Art
This class will consider the project of making works for and in public space, taking the question of the politically contested nature of public spaces as a fundamental issue. We will also consider site visits, artmaking in public space, publicness, concept testing/maquette making and appropriateness of materials.
Course work will focus on the discussion of assigned readings, research and contemporary works for public spaces. Students will develop and create a temporary piece for a public site/context of their choosing.

SCLP 312 S002 Sculpture: Special Topics (3)
Wednesdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Colleen Brown

Topic: The Human Factor: The Figure in Contemporary Sculpture

In this studio course, we’ll take a look at why the figure was frog-marched out of sculpture during the Modern period and why it seems to be elbowing its way back in now. We’re going to start with a bit of history to locate ourselves on a timeline starting with Rosalind Krauss’ Sculpture in the Expanded Field and sections of Thierry de Duve’s Look!: 100 Years of Contemporary Art. From there, our reading, talking and making will flesh out and interrogate one basic premise; figures express aspects of an artist’s implicit and explicit ideas of what being human means. To make figures and understand other artists’ figures we need to look at our own ideas of “human”. During the course, each student will clarify for themselves their understanding what it means to be a person. We’ll use tools we find in art history, philosophy and in art-making to see how ideas of “human” change and how these ideas are expressed in sculpture.

Readings will be kept short to give you as much time as possible for thinking and making. I will lead you in some techniques designed to help you compose your thoughts so you can share them with your peers during class. Participation in discussion and critique will be highly valued and we will spend some of our time discussing the critique as a form of communication and how to make the most of it. 

The grade for the course will be derived from one very quick and two substantial studio assignments, two one-page writing assignments and active participation which will be measured by handing in a few sentences, a sketch or some other very short response each week.

SCLP 312 S003 Sculpture: Special Topics (3)

Fridays, 1:00pm - 3:50pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Kelly Lycan

Topic: Socially Engaged Sculpture
This studio course presents a variety of approaches to contemporary sculpture practice and requires that students research, produce proposals and execute projects with socially engaged considerations. This course is intended for students who are interested in collaboration and making work that engages with the public. The history of socially engaged practices will be examined and the course will include readings, discussion, and group critiques. Student will be encouraged and required to work with each other as a group to create projects.

SOCS 300 S002 Studies in the Sciences (3)

Wednesdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Jamie Hilder

Topic: Time
This course is designed to investigate the cultural, ideological, and political constructions of Time. From the development of clock time to the commodification of time in the age of finance capital, material will be introduced and discussed in order to question how Time operates as an ordering phenomenon, developing particular subjectivities and affecting social relations.

SOCS 302 S001 The Ethics of Representation (3)

Tuesdays, 3:50pm – 6:40pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Su-Anne Yeo

Topic: Gentrification

This course will offer a critical and contextual analysis of urban gentrification in Vancouver and the role of art, design, and media in its reproduction or contestation. It will be interdisciplinary in orientation.

WRTG 201 S002 Writing Across the Arts (3)

Thursdays, 8:30am-11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Tara Wren

Topic: Designerly Ways of Writing

We will explore different designerly methods of writing, using design studio practices to make written work. Using visual techniques like mind-mapping can connect designers more deeply to their writing, making writing a natural part of the design process. We'll draw examples and insights from interdisciplinary sources, and develop personalized writing practices that focus on making user-centred texts. Discussion and assignments will focus on forms of writing specific to the design program. While this course focuses on writing for design, developing a designerly way of writing is a practice useful for students from all critical and studio disciplines.

VAST 310 S001 Visual Arts: Special Topics (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Mimi Gellman

Topic: Decolonial Aesthetics

Decolonial Aesthetics will explore and link decolonization strategies and aesthetics with the aim of learning to think and see “otherwise.” Through presentations, readings, discussions and art-making we will consider the aesthetic perspectives and philosophies of non-western cultures and explore strategies to decolonize our own lenses. Cree scholar Winona Wheeler explains that decolonization entails, “developing a critical consciousness about the causes of oppression, the distortion of our history, our own collaboration and the degrees to which we have internalized colonialist ideas and practices.”

The course will also investigate Indigenous aesthetic realms. The significance of imparting concepts of Indigenous aesthetics to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars has consequences that extend far beyond the aesthetic realm of cultural production.

The class will begin with theoretical readings and written responses. For the final project, the students will be tasked with creating an artwork that demonstrates a decolonized mind, practice or approach.

Note: Students who enroll in VAST 310 S001 must also enroll in HUMN 311 S002 Visual Arts Seminar

VAST 310 S002A Visual Arts: Special Topics (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 11:30am, Spring 2018

Instructor: Valerie Walker

Topic: Interactive Wearables

This course explores the notion of fabric as a responsive interface. It will introduce students to new material and conceptual possibilities for interactivity: creating embroidered circuits, screen-printing or painting with reactive inks, embedded mobile networks and the potentials of woven electronics. This material and conceptual exploration will be presented within a contextual framework of contemporary practice, and will explore the creation of hybrid works that investigate intersections between art and design, sculpture and performance, fashion and computing, the body and its context, public and private.

VAST 310 S003E Visual Arts: Special Topics (3)

Mondays, 1:00pm – 3:50pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Valerie Walker

Topic: Web Practices

This intermediate studio course addresses the design, composition, and construction of interactivity in web-based environments. Here students will apply the use of HTML and CSS to more detailed editing of WordPress templates and explore interactivity through javascript and jquery. Additionally, students will begin to explore mobile based computing processes.

VAST 310 S004G Visual Arts: Special Topics (3)

Tuesdays, 12:30pm – 3:20pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Valerie Walker

Topic: Creative Electronics: Robotics

Contemporary artists and designers have joined their bodies with electronic media in order to create robotic, kinetic and interactive movement in contemporary artworks incorporating kinesthesia, surrogate bodies and artificial intelligence. Students will learn more advanced techniques and approaches to making art using electronics. Movement, light, sound, and interfaces between technology and the body will be the elements developed in this class.

VAST 310 S005Q Visual Arts: Special Topics

(Combined with FVIM 328 S005Q: Performance)

Mondays, 4:30pm -7:20pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Randy Lee Cutler

Topic: Performance 

Designed for students interested in focusing on or incorporating performance in their work. This course facilitates a broad skill and technical level for students. Through class-room workshops, exercises, readings, and discussion, students gain a thorough understanding of performance art and its implications.

VAST 210 S006R Visual Art Studio: Topic (3)

VAST 310 S006R Visual Arts: Special Topics (3)

Wednesdays, 1:00pm-3:50pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Annie Briard

Topic: Art practice and Awe

The ability to affect an audience by crafting experiences that can etch themselves into a viewer’s memory is a discernable strength of many an art practice. Of the various tools the creative practitioner has at their disposal, awe is among the most powerful. Despite its currency in art however, the concept of awe and the conditions that instigate its occurrence can be evasive. Likewise, there remains ground to be covered in its analysis, and in the ways in which awe is considered within the gallery, and beyond.

Through gently guided and independent studio projects, participants in this course will engage with the concept and experience of awe through research and artistic production. Important exhibitions on awe and wonder will be used as case studies in our analysis, while readings will give fodder for reflections on the various ways in which artists might make use of these approaches. Course projects will be shaped in accordance with participants’ interests, with exploration and risk-taking at the helm. As part of a special collaboration between the Audain Faculty of Art and TED, final projects will have the opportunity to be considered for exhibition at the TED international conference in Vancouver in spring 2018.

VAST 420 S001D Visual Arts Thematic II (6)

Tuesdays, 12:30pm – 3:20pm, 3:50pm – 6:40pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Jacqueline Turner

Topic: Writing the City

This course considers the space of the city as the vector through which to experiment with writing as a substantial material practice. The structures of the city will be considered as modes for potential forms of writing including explorations of social spaces, the relationships between writing + walking, and the development of site-specific practices, among others. Connections to other visual practices will be encouraged. Contemporary literary work will be investigated to provide the basis to build individual interpretations, styles, and techniques. The course will culminate in a project, supported by research, that demonstrates the individually directed intersections between writing the city and students’ developing studio practice.

WRTG 401 S001D Senior Writing Studio (6)

Tuesdays, 12:30pm – 3:20pm, 3:50pm – 6:40pm, Spring 2018

Instructor: Jacqueline Turner

Topic: Writing the City

This course considers the space of the city as the vector through which to experiment with writing as a substantial material practice. The structures of the city will be considered as modes for potential forms of writing including explorations of social spaces, the relationships between writing + walking, and the development of site-specific practices, among others. Connections to other visual practices will be encouraged. Contemporary literary work will be investigated to provide the basis to build individual interpretations, styles, and techniques. The course will culminate in a project, supported by research, that demonstrates the individually directed intersections between writing the city and students’ developing studio practice.