Special Topics for Summer 2017 and Fall 2017

Special Topics 

Please note: this page will be updated as information is confirmed. In case of a discrepancy between this page and InsideEC, the information on InsideEC will be deemed correct.

  • Additional information on these courses is available at https://myec.ecuad.ca/
  • Most credit courses have prerequisites that are clearly outlined on the website.

Fall 2017

AHIS 335 F001 – History of Ceramics Practice (3)

Thursdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Fall 2017

Instructor: Paul Mathieu

This course is of interest to any student attending Emily Carr University, whether they are in the Art, Design or Media programs. We will examine ceramics relationship to Painting and Drawing, Printmaking, Illustration and Photography, Sculpture and Architecture, Design and Media. Whatever your area of interest, this course will be useful in expanding your understanding of your own practice as it relates to history and to cultures.

CCID 202 F002 – Fieldwork: Special Topics (3)

Fridays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: TBA

Topic: Critical Research, Methods + Practices

This is one out of a quartet of linked and sequenced courses which focus on critical research methods and practice, designed as Year 2 core curriculum for the BFA in Critical and Cultural Practice but open to all interested students.  These 12 credits spread over the academic year, composed of HUMN-205-F002 + CCID-202-F002 in Fall 2017 and HUMN-205-S002 + CCID-202-S002 in Spring 2018 (thus 3 Critical Studies credits + 3 studio credits per semester), with meetings every Tuesday afternoon for textual analysis/theory and Friday afternoon for fieldwork/practice during term time, aim to provide a solid basis for critical making and cultural inquiry.

A dedicated team of multi-disciplinary teachers are co-devising this innovative course, which will be co-delivered in 2017-2018.  Topics will build from Year 1 Critical Studies curriculum and range from iconography and discourse analysis to political economy and new materialism, from chance and aleatory procedures to science and technology studies, from phenomenology and auto-ethnography to intersectionality and decolonisation.

IMPORTANT NOTE: CCID 202 F002 and HUMN 205 F002 are linked, so you must sign up for both in the Fall 2017 semester, and then again in the Spring 2018 semester.

CRAM 304 F001L – Ceramics: Special Topics (3)

Mondays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Fall 2017

Instructor: TBA

Topic: Wheelthrowing
The wheel is investigated as a tool to create hollow forms to be used in a variety of contexts. Students develop an understanding and control of wheel-throwing, learn to fire electric and gas kilns, and are introduced to glazing and surfacing materials. Using clay, students acquire practical, critical and historical tools to consider ceramics and pottery within contemporary culture and current art practices. Demonstrations, discussions, and presentations are regularly scheduled. Assigned and self-directed projects are developed and discussed in critiques. This course is cross-listed with CRAM 202 F001L .

DESN 350 F001 Topics Interdiscipline Design (3)

Tuesdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Louise St. Pierre

Topic: This Forest Thinks

This interdisciplinary course will include immersive activities in nature at an outdoor center, local park or green space to investigate design’s relationship with nature. Students will be asked to prototype-in-nature (Earthbond Prototyping) to push the boundaries of their personal relationship to nature; dirty hands, wet knees, deep observation and a panoply of sensory experiences are encouraged. Students will develop projects that translate their sensitized connection to nature into a design that would encourage biophilic connections among the general public. Outcomes may include experience design, installation and exhibit design and students will be given the opportunity to work though and across the disciplines of graphic, industrial, and interaction design. Collaborative projects are encouraged, but optional.

HUMN 205 F001 Perspectives in the Crit. (3)

Mondays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: TBA

Topic: Perspectives in Critical Humanities

The inaugural iteration of this new critical humanities course at Emily Carr invites students from all practices and intellectual persuasions to consider how to do things with words.  We will pay attention to texts across the humanities--how arguments are crafted, how assumptions are implied or made explicit or called into question, how forms of verbal expression are enhanced or undermined by how they appear or come across to readers and audiences, and how words work for or against dominant and marginal communities of meaning and existence--and to cultural, historical, and aesthetic contexts in the reception, adoption, and subversion of myths and other constitutional narratives in contemporary art, design, and media.  The course will be reading-intensive in the most rewarding of ways, as well as discussion-intensive to reveal, ultimately, a plurality of socio-political and disciplinary subtexts ripe for historiographical inquiry and critique.

HUMN 205 F002 Perspectives in the Crit. (3)

Tuesdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: TBA

Topic: Critical Research, Methods + Practices

This is one out of a quartet of linked and sequenced courses which focus on critical research methods and practice, designed as Year 2 core curriculum for the BFA in Critical and Cultural Practice but open to all interested students.  These 12 credits spread over the academic year, composed of HUMN-205-F002 + CCID-202-F002 in Fall 2017 and HUMN-205-S002 + CCID-202-S002 in Spring 2018 (thus 3 Critical Studies credits + 3 studio credits per semester), with meetings every Tuesday afternoon for textual analysis/theory and Friday afternoon for fieldwork/practice during term time, aim to provide a solid basis for critical making and cultural inquiry.

A dedicated team of multi-disciplinary teachers are co-devising this innovative course, which will be co-delivered in 2017-2018.  Topics will build from Year 1 Critical Studies curriculum and range from iconography and discourse analysis to political economy and new materialism, from chance and aleatory procedures to science and technology studies, from phenomenology and auto-ethnography to intersectionality and decolonisation.

IMPORTANT NOTE: HUMN 205 F002 and CCID 202 F002 are linked, so you must sign up for both in the Fall 2017 semester, and then again in the Spring 2018 semester.

HUMN 306 F001 Studies in the Humanities: Design (3)

Tuesdays, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Rob Stone

Topic: Making Space

This course takes architecture, design and urbanism as a starting point to think about changes in spatial practice and spatial sensibility in the period since mid-C20th. We will look at the formation of different kinds of domestic, civic, rural and metropolitan space during this time, and the different kinds of social relationships that these appear to have engendered. Our sources will come from examples of architecture, town planning and design, and the literatures on them, as well as cinema, choreography and visual art.  We will develop an appropriate theoretical understanding of the ‘subject’ of spatial discourse, one that draws on questions concerning the politicization and eroticization of space, elements of psychoanalysis and cartography, and the disassembling of the novel spaces of internet sociability. At some point, you will design a city.

HUMN 311 F002 Visual Art Seminar: Design (3)

Thursdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Justin Langlois

Topic: Don't Go It Alone: Collectives and Collaboration in Contemporary Practices

How can we organize ourselves to become more resilient? How should we gather as an expression of resistance? How might we work together to simply get more done? Across a range of contemporary practices, we can see the (re)emergence of collaborative and collective methodologies fostering new interdisciplinary projects, artist-run-infrastructures, and artworks that engage activism and social change. Whether considering our impacts on material resources or the political challenge that an individually-focused society fosters, we can find and urgency in considering how, why, and when we can work together. The exploration of artistic practices, models for organizing, and the production of collaborative artworks and collective entities will provide students with a variety of opportunities to think, learn, and work alongside one another. This course will offer a practical and theoretical exploration the role of collectivism and collaboration in visual arts and professional practices, culminating in a variety of hybrid studio and writing projects, supported by readings, workshops, and presentations.

PHOT 306 F030N – Special Topics in Photography (3) or

VAST 310 F030N Visual Arts: Special Topics (3)

Mondays, 1pm – 7:20pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Kyla Mallett

Topic: The World is Your Archive 

This special topics course is a 6-credit hybrid academic/studio course (HUMN 311 + VAST 310/PHOT 306), which focuses on current discourses on and around ideas of the archive and contemporary art. 

Over the last two decades, ideas of collecting, accumulating and archiving materials have made their way into established art practices, from exhibitions like Deep Storage (PS1, 1989) and Accumulated Materials (Vancouver Art Gallery 2005), to texts like Derrida’s Archive Fever (1995), Hal Foster’s An Archival Impulse (2004) and anthologies such as The Archive (Whitechapel Press, 2006). 

We will examine the relationship between ‘the archive’ and current art practices, and the emergence of archive-based practices, from straightforward photographic portfolios and artist’s books (Larry Clark, Steven Shore) to library-based artworks (Martha Rosler, The Reanimation Library) to constructed, fictional archives (Walid Raad, Susan Hiller, Ilya Kabakov), to alternative, classification-resistant, unruly archives, and so on.  We will look at a variety of ways in which artists engage with the idea of the archive from mining the personal to constructing the elaborate.

In this course, students will engage in readings and research, assignments and field trips, and the completion of a term project in which they consider traditional, creative and experimental approaches to engaging with ‘the archive’ with regards to their own art practice. This course is open to students from any area in 3rd year or above. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: PHOT 306/VAST 310 F030 & HUMN 311 F030 are LINKED so you must sign up for both. 

Please note this is also a Hybrid online/face-to-face course which means approximately 40-50% of the course will take place online using moodle. Students are expected to work online on parts of the course but also must be available to meet for the full scheduled class time. The schedule and expectations will be discussed in class.

NMSA 200 F001 – New Media + Sound Arts Core I: Topic (6)

Thursdays, 12:30pm-6:40pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Julie Andreyev

Topic: The Expanded Self in Everyday Life

The course explores how new technologies and new media practices can extend the senses and grow empathy. Methods include deep listening and expanded seeing techniques to explore our relationships with others, the city space, the earth. Students are asked to experiment with video, audio, interactive and mobile technologies, and deploy these investigations into a variety of new media practices, such as in video installation, sound walks, sound installation, new media performance. Students are afforded opportunities for research, reflection, analysis, iteration; feedback, discussion and reworking opportunities are encouraged throughout the course. The course includes field trips that inform research/production on projects, and visits to galleries/events to support knowledge of contemporary new media art. The course builds flexibility and adaptability into the syllabus in order to respond to student interest, abilities and expertise. 

PRNT 232 F002V & F003W – Print Media: Book Media (3) (cross-listed)

DESN 202 F002V & F003W – Strategies + Visualization (3)

Fridays, 1pm – 3:50pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Beth Howe and Jon Hannan

Topic: Artist's Books and the Graphic Object

This course is co-taught and will consider ideas of sequencing and structure in the translation of concepts into printed form through two lenses: artist's books and the graphic object.
The artist book module will examine the making, publication, and distribution of printed matter in the context of contemporary visual art practice. Students will acquire hand bookbinding skills and produce editioned and unique bookworks in relationship to their practices as artists and/or designers.
The graphic module will explore the role design has to play in delivering visual content through typography, image making and experimental print techniques. The generation of content may include personal responses to themes, spaces as well as other interactions and external influences.
In addition, the course may include collaborative projects, participation in book fairs, and relevant field trips.

PRNT 307 F001 / ILUS 306 F001 - Print Media Practices (cross-listed with ILUS 306) (6)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 3:20pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Diyan Achjadi

Topic: The Silkscreened Poster

At its most basic form, a poster is a printed piece paper, duplicated and publicly displayed in order to disseminate information to a broad public. Posters have been used throughout history as platforms for the distribution of ideas, for the notification of upcoming events, as well as for the promotion and advertisement of goods and services.  In this class we will explore the printed poster, particularly in its non-commercial contexts: as protest, as declaration, as art object, and as public intervention.  Lectures and presentations on the history of the poster, research projects into particular artists and/or aspects of the poster, and directed assignments will provide a context for students to develop an independent series of silkscreen-printed posters. No prior printmaking experience is required; the course will include instruction in silkscreen techniques.

SCLP 312 F001 – Sculpture: Special Topics (3)

Fridays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Fall 2017

Instructor: Emily Hermant

Topic: Fiber Sculpture
This studio course examines the resurgence of fiber in contemporary art practice and provides a critical lens through which to examine issues of gender and labor, class, domesticity, utility and decoration, skill, time, process, value and production. The historical and theoretical content of the course will provide students with the necessary grounding to broaden their ideas about the role of fiber in contemporary sculpture practices. Students will learn about the histories that inform this initially utilitarian tradition, to an experimental, hybrid platform for artists to create dynamic, sculptural forms.  Students will be introduced to tools, materials and processes used to produce fiber-based sculpture. Through a series of assigned and self-directed projects, students will experiment with malleable, fibrous materials and construction methods such as weaving, knotting, plaiting, coiling, crochet and felt-making to create three-dimensional fiber structures. Research, readings, discussions, and critiques are an integral part of the course.

SOCS 330 F001 Photography, Society and Culture (3)

Wednesdays, 4:30 pm – 7:20 pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Rob Stone

Topic: Photographs

This course is designed as a history of the continuing re-emergence of photography and the theories and remarks that have sought to explain its pervasive complexity. Structured in a series of questionable assertions about the nature of photography as a practice, the course approaches the continual coming about of photography as a form of knowledge which has philosophical, aesthetic, technical and political dimensions to it. 

We will look at the many different forms of documentary, landscape, portrait, sporting, military etc. photographies that have emerged since the inception of the camera. The Xerox, x-rays, the internet, digital manipulation, all of these things will inform our appreciation of photography, as well as its relationships to the body, to protest, to the land, warfare and all the other things that photography bears on.

VAST 400 F004 – Senior Studio (Open Studio) (6)

Wednesdays, 1pm – 7:20 pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Kyla Mallett and Elizabeth McIntosh

Topic: Feminist Senior Studio

This Senior Studio course will focus on Feminist perspectives and discourses in relationship to students’ emerging practices and the field of contemporary art. This studio course will encourage self-directed work alongside inclusive and productive discourse from multiple perspectives on feminism. Students need not make work about feminist content; this is an Interdisciplinary Open Studio course: all practices and identities are welcome!

VAST 320 F001Q – Visual Arts Thematic I (6)

VAST 420 F001Q – Visual Arts Thematic II (6)

Tuesdays, 12:30pm – 6:40pm, Fall 2017

Instructor: Ingrid Koenig

Topic: Black Holes and Other Entanglements in the Studio

This interdisciplinary studio course uses science as a lens through which to view and speak about the current world and invisible forces of the known universe, interacting with these perspectives in the context of art practice. Students investigate and experiment with conceptual and material transformations that arise from being inspired, informed and mystified by phenomena in physics and other probing areas. The breadth of scientific fields to be encountered will depend on students’ individual research interests, while weekly topics address themes such as quantum particle behavior, biology and new materialism. The narrative of science contextualized in human experience, the abstract, embodied, misinterpreted, the complex rhizome, construction of knowledge, play of metaphor, connectivity, uncertainty, energy transformation, entropy, chaos theory, dark matter – these are all subjects for studio entanglements.

Students will participate in the Artist-in-Residence Program at TRIUMF, (Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics with its cyclotron particle accelerator). Other field trips will include a new exhibition on the emerging field of art and neuroscience, and if time allows students will have a studio day at the Beaty Biodiversity Museum.

Students do not need a science background. What they do need is an open and flexible approach for an experimental trajectory of interactions.

Summer 2017

AHIS 333 SU01, SU02 + SU03 Interdisciplinary Forums (3)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:00am – 11:50am, Summer 2017 (Term 2)

Instructor: Phil Smith

Topic: Popular Culture and the Arts of Persuasion

From its inception (usually tied to the beginnings of cinema), the persuasive power of popular culture was apparent. Initially relying on a more direct and propagandistic (in the neutral sense of the word) approach, by the 1950s more subtle techniques of persuasion, often linked to psychological protocols and visual art processes, began to be interpolated, giving rise to the realization of popular culture’s alternative potential as a “soft power”.

Accordingly this course will examine this evolution from the 1890s to the present, beginning with a general overview of the framework and forms of popular culture before narrowing the focus to an examination of these arts of persuasion within some specific mediums, film, animation, advertising, comics, television, and popular music being some of the possible areas of discussion.

These perspectives will be explored through lectures, screenings, and guest speakers as well as in the seminars that follow each lecture. Participants in the course will be encouraged to consider these arts of persuasion both as a critical foundation for evaluating today’s popular culture and, if desired, to also consider interpolating some of these persuading techniques into their own practice, whether it be art, design or media-based.

AHIS 336 SU01 – Hist. + Contemporary Movements (3)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00pm – 3:50pm, Summer 2017 (Term 2)

Instructor: Dr. Ariane Noël de Tilly

Topic: Art and Revolution

This special topic course will focus on the role and function of art during several revolutions since the French Revolution, including the Russian Revolution, the Mexican Revolution, the Cuban Revolution, and the Chinese Cultural Revolution. One of the aims of this course is to further understand how the revolutionaries, counter-revolutionaries and/or artists defined the role of art in these periods of revolution. During the course of the semester, we will look at the different types of works produced in the context of these revolutions, from paintings to caricatures, from propaganda posters to films.

CCID 202 SU02C + CCID 302 SU02C – Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:00am – 3:00pm, Summer 2017 (Term 1)

Instructor: Justin Langlois

Topic: LandMarks 2017: On Site

Students will be responsible for attending pertinent parts of the LandMarks exhibition in Stanley Park from June 10-25, including project installation and take-down, and performances or workshops, as required.

This course builds upon an innovative partnership, linking students to a nationally synchronized set of courses and exhibitions exploring critical themes related to present-day environmental and climatic crises, the legacies of colonialism, and the complex relationship between nationhood and cultural identity. Students do not have to have taken the Spring 2017 LandMarks course to participate -- everyone is welcome.

LandMarks is a network of collaborative, contemporary art projects across Parks Canada places during the 150th year of Canadian Confederation. Using art as a catalyst for discourse and social change, LandMarks looks forward, and provides an opportunity to imagine, to speculate, and to invent our futures through the eyes of artists, art students, communities, and through the spirit of the land.

This course will introduce students to a wide range of contemporary practitioners, critical perspectives, and opportunities for creating new artwork in public spaces. As a core part of this course, students will participate in an exhibition in Stanley Park from June 10 - 25, and will work collaboratively and individually to realize new public projects. Students will have unprecedented access and resources to curators, professional artists, and opportunities for sharing their work with wider publics, as this course will be directly linked with the nationwide LandMarks exhibition. You can find out more about this project at www.landmarks2017.ca.

CCID 202 SU01A + CCID 302 SU01A – Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00pm – 3:50pm, Summer 2017 (Term 2)

Instructor: Ashley Guindon

Topic: The Art of the Mural: Community Engagement on a Grand Scale

Working as a creative practitioner in the public realm is tremendously rewarding, but there are so many details to consider that the very idea of a public practice can be intimidating. How does one balance creative expression with community expectations? What are the logistics involved in translating a work from an idea into a completed neighbourhood landmark? Is all the coordination and risk worth the eventual reward? This class offers students an opportunity to directly engage in practice-based coursework by producing a wall mural in the Vancouver neighbourhood of Marpole. Students will have the chance to engage in all aspects of a public art mural project; including design, partnership building, community engagement, project management, and installation. This is an opportunity to develop practical experience working in the public realm and explore new approaches for understanding audience, engagement, and negotiation. Students will also be involved in the production of other Emily Carr University murals in progress as part of the Vancouver Mural Festival This class will be an off-site experience based in the Oak Park Fieldhouse - a chance to take practice beyond the classroom and into the community. Class sessions will be active and varied, with workshops, student-led activities, site visits, planning sessions, discussions of current practice, and lots of painting. Assignments will integrate studio and professional skills and be applicable for students across departments and levels.

DHIS 310 SU90 Online Course – History of Canadian Design (3)

Required: Live Chat two times each week – Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7:00pm – 8:00pm, Summer 2017 (Term 1)

Instructor: Sam Carter

Topic: History of Canadian Design 

The history of Canadian design and craft provides insights into development of applied arts in Canada from earliest times to present. This broad based survey course explores the regions of the Circumpolar Arctic, Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario, Prairies and Pacific. Founding Nations, European, Asian and other contributors to Canadian craft and design will be explored. Key Canadian individuals and their contributions to design and craft in will acknowledge and encourage greater awareness of Canadian content. Communities, governments, and industries noted for their influences and promotion of Canadian design will be discussed. The course will encourage greater understanding of both ‘folk’ and ‘academic’ theories of applied arts in Canada.

ENGL 201 SU01 – Writing Across the Arts (3)

Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:00pm – 3:50pm, Summer 2017 (Term 1)

Instructor: Tara Wren

Topic: Designerly Ways of Writing

We will explore different designerly methods of writing, using design studio practices to make written work. Visual techniques like mind-mapping can connect designers more deeply to their writing, making writing a natural part of the design process. We’ll draw examples and insights from interdisciplinary sources, and develop personalized writing practices that focus on making user-centred texts. Discussion and assignments will focus on forms of writing specific to the design program.

While this course focuses on writing for design, developing a designerly way of writing is a practice useful for students from all critical and studio disciplines. 

ENGL 201 SU02 – Writing Across the Arts (3)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00pm – 3:50pm, Summer 2017 (Term 2)

Instructor: Tara Wren

Topic: Maker Culture 

We are bombarded daily with messages imploring and commanding us to buy things, not just because we might need them, but because they promise to make us cooler, or better, or more enviable people. It's not just do you use an iPhone or an android, but are you an iPhone or android person? Some people are dissatisfied with this consumer culture, and are coalescing around a maker culture. Maker culture isn't just about making things - it's about making things you are not good at making. We so often focus on gaining knowledge and expertise in just a few areas - but what happens when we make things we are decidedly NOT expert at?

Students will be asked to plan and make something they have never made before (cupcakes? a videogame? a shirt? a map? a watch? perfume?). They will document and share their process and project with the class, then consider their experience as an inexpert maker.

This class is suitable for students at all levels who wants to improve their critical reading and writing skills or engage with the above topic. Readings will be drawn from both design and visual arts perspectives.

HUMN 307 SU01 – Environmental Ethics (3)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00pm – 3:50pm, Summer 2017 (Term 1)

Instructor: Cameron Cartier

Topic: Special Food Edition

In this particular course we will consider the influence and impact of human relationships to the land, the sea, our watersheds, and the non-human (animal, plant, mineral)—in short, to the ecological systems that we depend upon. We will explore the space between ecological ethics and environmental justice, as well as what constitutes an ecological praxis in the process of exploring ethics as an open question, an ongoing dialogue, an ability to listen and to respond with reflection, creative acts, design possibilities and lifelong learning.

In this special Summer 2017 edition of environmental ethics, we will consider these environmental issues through the lens of food. This will be a “hands-on” approach to our environmental relationships with numerous site visits, food projects, and cultural exchanges.

HUMN 311 SU90 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Online, Summer 2017 (Term 1)

Instructor: Merritt Johnson

Topic: Art, Culture, Body, Community, Land

This course invites students to pursue and expand their current work in connection to containers in any and all forms including physically and symbolically. The course will consider bodies of knowledge and containers of culture including but not limited to books, film, art objects, images, actions, songs and performance. The course will consider both Indigenous and Colonial understandings and engagement with containers, and invites the participation and contribution of students from all backgrounds working in all media and material. Students are expected to expand their studio work through active engagement with the ways our work holds information and ideas, and the possibilities and responsibilities of artists and makers to create and open containers of knowledge and vision.

HUMN 311 SU91 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Online, Summer 2017 (Term 2)

Instructor: Merritt Johnson

Topic: The Body and the Body Politic: subsistence, migration, invasion, occupation, collaboration, coercion, resistance and coexistence

This course invites student to consider the physical bodies of living things (human and otherwise) in relation to the political body of the Nation/State. Students from all backgrounds are encouraged to research, explore and create work that connects them to this relationship, past, present or future. The course will consider both Indigenous and Colonial understandings and engagement with the Body Politic and the body, and invites the participation and contribution of students from all backgrounds working in all media and material. Students are expected to expand and deepen their studio work through research and practice, and through engaging with course questions, reflections, and conversation via online forums.

HUMN 311 SU92 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Online, Summer 2017 (Term 2)

Instructor: Felicia Gail

Topic: Intimate and Immense: Regarding The Poetics of Space

Throughout the journey of the course, Intimate and Immense: Regarding The Poetics of Space, each student will consider a contemporaneous take on the artist’s socio-political, and meta-physical sense of place through the reading and interpretation of Gaston Bachelard’s, “The Poetics of Space.” We will discursively consider how we, as makers, interpret meaning from conceptual and applied translations of intimate and immense space through the context of multi-disciplinary works in text, visual art, and aural exposition, simultaneously asking the question, “how do we communicate the offline experience of artistic practice with the online representation as such?”As a pivot point for what will be an intersubjective course, we will contemplate topohilia (from Greek topos, “place” and -phillia, “love of”), paying special attention to the chapter, “Intimate Immensity.”

In this course each student will participate by documenting site-specific location readings with image capturing, free-writing, as well as forum discussions. Each student will complete assigned and proposed projects based on each student’s practice using the required text as a road map. Supplemental readings will include authors such as: Carol Mavor, Rebecca Solnit, Susan Stewart, and selected poets and other art writers.

Required text(PDF provided): Gaston Bachelard, “The Poetics of Space: The Classic Look At How We Experience Intimate Places.”

ILUS 208 SU01 – Illustration Process: Topics (3)

Monday and Wednesdays, 1:00pm – 4:15pm, Summer 2017 (Term 2)

Instructor: Mariam Libicki

Topic: The Narrative Figure

A sequential artist 'acts' through figure drawing. A figure in narrative must draw the reader's attention, and hold it in sympathy, disgust, identification or curiosity. If 'art' is the successful creation of an intentional emotion or thought in another person through a work of imagination and insight, (as defined by children's book editor Cheryl Klein), then the figure is the narrative artist's main messenger of those emotions. Without the use of movement, the figure in sequential art must further communicate time, and its effects.

In this class, we'll explore techniques from comics/manga, animation, caricature, life drawing and creative writing to create strong, intentional storytelling figures for any narrative art form.

ILUS 306 SU01B – Illustration Practices: Topics (6)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:00am – 3:50pm, Summer 2017 (Term 2)

Instructor: Skai Fowler

Topic: Scenic Painting

This course is an introduction to the materials, media and techniques used in scenic art. It is primarily geared towards students with an interest in pursuing a career in the film and theatre industry; but it is suitable for those with little or no experience in scene painting. The course will introduce various scene painting techniques such as faux finishing, tromp l'oeil amount others.

PNTG 315 SU01B – Painting Practices: Topics (6)

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:00am – 3:50pm, Summer 2017 (Term 2)

Instructor: Skai Fowler

Topic: Scenic Painting

This course is an introduction to the materials, media and techniques used in scenic art. It is primarily geared towards students with an interest in pursuing a career in the film and theatre industry; but it is suitable for those with little or no experience in scene painting. The course will introduce various scene painting techniques such as faux finishing, tromp l'oeil amount others.