Special Topics for Summer 2018

Special Topics 

Please note: this page will be updated as information is confirmed. In case of a discrepancy between this page and myEC, the information on myEC will be deemed correct.

  • Additional information on these courses is available at https://myec.ecuad.ca/
  • Most credit courses have prerequisites that are clearly outlined on the website.

Summer 2018

AHIS 201 SU01 – Global Perspectives in Art (3)

Mondays + Wednesdays, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Randip Bakshi

Topic: Asia Modern: Art and Architecture from 1800 to a Global Present

This course is intended as an introduction to the art and architecture of modern East, South, and Southeast Asia. At the same time, this course explores the “essence of Modernism,” to quote Clement Greenberg, through a survey of the major movements in the visual arts and design, starting around 1800, but quickly expanding from there to a global scale in the contemporary era. Developing historically within the framework of industrialism and advanced capitalism, colonialism and class conflict, this course follows the course of global art history amidst political upheaval, globalization, and the digital revolution. This is not a survey of modern Asian art rather we will use key artistic movements, such as Abstraction and Social Realism, and use a comparative perspective to reconstruct the expansive history of modern Asian art and architecture from 1800 to the present. Each week we will focus on a set of case studies, such as the work of specific artists or works of architecture framed by a global artistic movement in specific Asian cities. Class lectures will be complemented by a close examination of modern Asian art collections in the Greater Vancouver Area, such as the Vancouver Art Gallery, Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, Center A, the Chinese Cultural Center, and the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. Simultaneously, taking advantage of our location and the presence of numerous Asian artists in the area, we will venture outside the classroom to seek out histories of modern Asian art on campus, and in our communities.

AHIS 303 SU01 – Canadian Art I (3)

Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Ariane Noel de Tilly

Topic: Exploring Territories

This course will provide students with an overview of developments in Canadian art from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present adopting a variety of territorial perspectives: cultural, historical, geographical, social, and political. From the paintings of Emily Carr to the drawings of Annie Pootoogook, from the abstracts paintings of Paul-Émile Borduas and the Automatistes to the videos and films of the collective Isuma, from the conceptual practice of N.E. Thing Co. to the video installations of Stan Douglas, from the performances of Rebecca Belmore to the Reconciliation Pole of James Hart, this course will particularly focus on how artists have explored, documented, imagined, or defended different types of territories.

AHIS 333 SU01 + SU02 + SU03 – Interdisciplinary Forums (3)

Tuesdays + Thursdays, 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Phil Smith

Topic: Popular Music and Art/Design/Media

“The Beatles have had a bigger influence on me than Picasso” - Damien Hirst (artist), 2009

From Piet Mondrian’s affinity for “boogie-woogie” music and Jackson Pollock’s preferred studio soundtrack of jazz to the punk rock scenes of the 1970s, from the birth of the music video in the early years of film and animation to Jeff Koons’s recent CD cover for Lady Gaga, popular music and art/design/media have long had a particularly close and often symbiotic relationship. Accordingly, this course will explore a number of songwriters, performers, and artists who exemplify this cross-pollination of disciplines with particular attention paid to four convergent concepts: persona, process, performance, and professional practice.

And there are two other “P’ words also currently relevant to cultural production: those of protest and product. Popular music has consistently been, to use a musical metaphor, “the canary in the coal mine”, that is, quick off the mark in addressing issues ranging from race, class, and gender (for example, Billie Holiday/Michael Jackson, Elvis/The Beatles, and David Bowie/Madonna respectively) to the impact of technological change on both creative (recording techniques and technologies) and distribution processes (the radio of the 1930s/cassette tapes in the 1960s/ Spotify and Apple Music today) providing an excellent exemplum by which to examine the structures and impacts of popular culture as a whole.

These perspectives will be explored through lectures, screenings, and guest speakers as well as in the seminars that follow each lecture. Participants in the course will be encouraged to consider aspects of popular music both as a critical foundation for evaluating today’s popular culture overall and, if desired, to also consider interpolating some of its approaches and techniques (from the making to the marketing) into their own practice, whether it be art, design, or media-based.

ANIM 325 SU01 – Topics in Animation (3)

Fridays + Saturdays, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Ken Priebe

Topic: Fundamentals of Stop Motion Animation

This course will cover the basics of building and animating puppets using soft wire armatures. Course topics include basic clay animation, wire armature building and latex build-up puppet fabrication, puppet animation, rig removal, and object animation. Between sessions, students should plan to work on campus to complete assignments, and use any stop-motion app on a phone or tablet for at least one assignment. At the end of the course, students will have the basic knowledge needed to take on more complex puppet fabrication and animation projects.

Students should reserve a small budget for optional supplies they may wish to purchase on their own.

Dates:

June 8-9

June 15-16

June 22-23

9am-12pm, 1pm-4pm

CCID 202 SU01C + CCID 302 SU01C – Fieldwork Topics (3)

Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Jaymie Johnson

Topic: Going Big: The Art of the Mural

Working as a creative practitioner in the public realm is tremendously rewarding, but there are so many things to consider that the very idea can be too intimidating. How does one balance creative expression with community expectations? What are the logistics involved in translating a work from an idea into a polished neighbourhood landmark? Is all of the coordination and risk worth the eventual reward?

This class offers students an opportunity to engage in practice-based coursework by producing a mural on the Famous Foods building on Kingsway in tandem with the Vancouver Mural Festival. Students will have the chance to engage in all aspects of a public art mural project, including design, partnership building, community engagement, project management, and installation. This is an opportunity to develop practical experience working in the public realm and explore new approaches for understanding audience, engagement, and negotiation.

Class sessions will be active and varied, with workshops, student-led activities, site visits, planning sessions, and discussions of current practice. Assignments will integrate studio and professional skills and be applicable for students across departments and levels.

CCID 202 SU02D + CCID 302 SU02D – Fieldwork Topics (3)

Wednesdays + Fridays, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Sarah Van Borek

Topic: Environmental Ethics + Education with Sound + Video Documentation, partnered with the David Suzuki Foundation.

Making Wave[form]s is an outdoor education-meets-environmental art activism project championing the right to clean water. The course is offered in partnership with Canada's leading environmental organization, the David Suzuki Foundation (DSF).

From a canoeing and drawing trip (TBC) to DJ-ing tracks recorded with an underwater microphone, this dynamic twist to documentary practices has students go on several field trips in nature, build meaningful connections with peoples and places and create sound and video art that raises awareness about ecosystem-based and mainly indigenous perspectives on the impacts (on humans and non-humans) of a lack of and/or access to clean water. Examples of some of the impacts may include: drought and its effect on traditional medicine production, oil pipeline expansions and the threat to orca whales, and restoration work influencing salmon returning to an urban stream.

Through a collaboration with the Native Education College (NEC) , students will experience a classroom and First Nations cultural activities inside the remarkable NEC longhouse. Students will be part of co-creating knowledge for a sustainable future, discovering intersections between indigenous traditional ecological knowledge and western science and how this can be a source of artistic inspiration, while making a positive impact in the real world.

Student projects will form part of a campaign supporting DSF’s goal to hold the federal government accountable to its commitment to end all long-term drinking water advisories in First Nations communities by 2021 while showcasing examples of indigenous-led solutions to the First Nations drinking water crisis across Canada .

The course will culminate in a public screening/launch and dialogue event at Vancouver’s Museum of Anthropology (MOA). Student projects may also form part of MOA’s educational programming that is popular with Vancouver schools. MOA is a high-profile cultural institution that features extensive collections from around the world as well as a wide range of temporary exhibitions, guided tours and other events. In 2016 MOA had 180,000 visitors. No prior audio/video experience is required to take this course and students across all disciplines are encouraged to join us.

[1] NEC is British Columbia’s largest Indigenous College and has been educating indigenous learners for 50 years. For more information: www.necvancouver.org

[1]DSF investigated the systemic challenges facing156 [boil-water] advisories in 110 [First Nations] communities last fall. [Source: https://globalnews.ca/news/3238948/first-nations-drinking-water-crisis-liberals-promise/]. “Among Canada's 600-plus reserves are numerous examples of failed water-treatment plants, water towers and other infrastructure. Some were undersized or poorly designed. Others used inappropriate technology. Still others failed prematurely because they were not properly maintained…Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has vowed to end boil-water advisories on reserves by 2021, and the federal government is pouring billions into these systems…For every system the government fixes, others remain in a shambolic state and at high risk of failing. [Source: https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/news/water-treatment-plants-fail-on-reserves-across-canada-globe-reviewfinds/article34094364/?ref=http://www.theglobeandmail.com]

CRAM 304 SU01 – Ceramics: Special Topics (3)

Monday to Thursday, 9:00am – 12:30pm, (Term 1)

Instructor: Jess Portfleet

Topic: Mold Making and Casting Techniques

In this course students with have the opportunity explore multiplicity and serialism using ceramic processes and mold making techniques. Instruction will include methods for creating models and multiple piece molds for slipcasting and press molding. Conceptual and technical support is provided for all functional and sculptural designs including slip mixing, assemblage, wheel work, surfacing and firing. This is a hands-on skills based course focused on the realization of individual mold driven projects. IMPORTANT NOTE - This course is a three-week intensive class, starting on Monday, June 4 and ending on Thursday, June 21.

HUMN 305 SU01F – Studies in the Humanities (3)

Combined with HUMN 306 SU01F – Studies in the Humanities: Design (3)

Mondays + Wednesdays, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Amanda Huynh

Topic: Have You Eaten Yet?: A Discussion of Food, Culture, Design & Race

This course explores the intersection of food, culture, social policy, environment and the impact that art and design can make in these crucial spaces we encounter daily. Course material will cover critical texts about the state of food systems in North America, along with examples of designed activism and interventions that have taken place.

Topics include the consumption of food and politics, the ethnic food aisle, migration and diaspora, food trends and xenophobia, food identity and cultural exchange. We will discuss racialized minorities and their place in the local systems, examining parallel food systems and the exclusive/hegemonic nature of the mainstream food system. Students will learn to negotiate and place themselves within the local food system.

Through research and practice, students will use food as a material and relational tool. The course aims to build students’ competency in engaging in conversations about food.

HUMN 305 SU90 – Studies in the Humanities (3)

Online Course Summer 2018

Instructor: Magnolia Pauker

Topic: Philosophy Live! Inter Views in Performance Philosophy…

This course will investigate the emerging field of Performance Philosophy. Considering how philosophy is itself a mode of performance, we will investigate its diverse forms by reading and viewing interviews, lectures, essays, and book excerpts. Our focus will be on the interview as a distinct form of public engagement where theory and practice intersect and through which the philosophical venue is opened to the public. Readings will be drawn from the work of Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Judith Butler, Edward Said, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, and Hito Steyerl among others. Screenings will include: Donna Haraway: Story Telling for Earthly Survival (2017), Examined Life (2008), Edward Said, The Last Interview (2004), Gilles Deleuze from A to Z (1996), The Gleaners and I (2000), Zizek! (2005), Derrida (2002), along with archival footage of televised interviews with Michel Foucault, Simone de Beauvoir, Avital Ronell, and others. Students will have the opportunity to research, conduct, and publish an interview or may propose an alternative for their term projects. The course will be conducted entirely online and students will not be required to attend campus.

HUMN 306 SU02 – Studies in the Humanities: Design (3)

Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Jeffrey Swartz

Topic: Design Criticism to Critical Design

This course engages criticism in contemporary design from complementary perspectives: while design criticism is about design, in written or spoken form, critical (also called “speculative”) design emerges through design, emerging by means of the applied project. As critical discourse in any form is closely bound to the desire for change, the course also focuses on activist design modes, whether for cultural, social or political objectives.

The course draws on historical, contemporary and theoretical references to examine the role of critical discourse in society in general and its specific meaning for design. To this end, we consider the many factors that criticism calls into play: freedom of speech and censorship; media, audience and perception of a relevant public; rhetoric, style and the development of a critical voice; For design specifically, we are required to study its specific history and theory, looking at case studies and theoretical tendencies which have set the terms for critical debate. Finally, the emergence of “critical design” as a specific category in the past 20 years allows us to look at historical precedents, review essential bibliography, feature leading proponents (critical designers) and highlight some of the key issues being debated.

This class introduces applied tasks in design criticism, critical design and design activism. Students speak and write about design, and are invited to develop a written-practical project with critical, speculative or activist intention.

HUMN 306 SU03 – Studies in the Humanities: Design (3)

Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Bonne Zabolotney

Topic: Domestic Space and Everyday Objects

“In short, space is a practiced place.”-Michel de Certeau

The word “domestic” has been in circulation since the early 15th century, and is derived from the latin “Domus,” meaning “house.” This term relates to ideas of the home: domestic space, domestic animals, domestic appliances, domestic violence, domestic bliss, etc. How do designers conceive, represent, analyze and design for domestic space, and how do we attribute value to the everyday objects that occupy this space? How do we theoretically and/or practically distinguish between a shelter, a house, a home? How do the objects within our home provide comfort, become objects of ritual, become luxuries or meet our basics needs and living standards? Why do some people collect objects, and why do they value them above other objects? How do we build a history of design based on these personal observations and experiences with objects? This course addresses these issues theoretically and historically, through readings, presentations and through practice-based activities including curation, exhibition, writing, and designing.

HUMN 311 SU90 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Online Course Summer 2018

Instructor: Merritt Johnson

Topic: A line in all directions is not a line

A non-media specific, cross disciplinary course welcoming all students to deeply pursue their creative practice and production. Lines are used to conceptualize trajectory, motion, time, space, thought, and continuum. Lines are not confined to drawing or mapping. Human conception of lines, and the structures we build and enforce with lines structures, determines and limits our perceptions and capacity for making. This course will begin by considering the existence of lines conceptually; using the idea of a line as an entry point to engage with how we are in the world, and how we contribute as artists. Students are invited to do research according to their own areas of interest around lines in any and all terms. Indigenous approaches to considering time, space, land and community have long been conceptualized in non-linear terms. Students will be introduced to visual and written works to begin dialogue around course investigation. Students are invited to collaborate on sharing knowledge, questions and possibility. Students may produce work including but not limited to: video, drawing in any and all media, sculpture in any and all media, performance, sound, and writing.

HUMN 311 SU91– Visual Art Seminar (3)

Online Course Summer 2018

Instructor: Merritt Johnson

Topic: Grounding Point A & Point B: Land as Constant

Land is constant, everything else is variable.

This course explores motion, existence, transit, migration, immigration, and transience of being in relation to land rather than place. Place is as we name it, as we speak it, as culture codes it, divides it, as it is used. Land exists, under, beyond, around, and through use, language, and division. The course invites students to engage with land as constant, how it can ground who we are, and what we do. Students will create work according to their own connection to and interest in the course topic. We are all moving between many points A & B, people have always moved, yet we are increasingly untethered to a single place; we are in transit in the pursuit of education, work, community, opportunity, and survival. This course invites students to engage with our relationship to place, time, and transit specifically through our relationship to the land, and in valuing land foreign and familiar. There is no site focus for the course, students will research and create work engaging with land as a foundation for visual culture and artistic production. Students will research according to their specific interest, in addition to researching according to their area of interest, and engaging with materials provided by the instructor coming from an Indigenous approach and perspective on land, introducing ways to engage with land and it’s varied significance in visual practice. Research and studio practice may expand to include connections to life and culture sustained by the land, and the ways the life connected to land has changed over time, including the present and imagined future. By working independently, students will activate a relationship to research within their individual art practices.

ILUS 208 SU01 – Illustration Process: Topic (3)

Tuesday and Thursdays, 9:00am – 12:00pm, (Term 2)

Instructor: Jesse Garbe

Topic: Colour

Colour is versatile and varied. It can be used to understand the visual world, alter perception, and promote complex, contradictory and interrelated ideas. In fact, the average human eye is estimated to be able to see approximately 1 million variations of colour. In other words, your favorite red and a friend’s favorite red could be thousands of shades apart. With this in mind, students will explore the broad terrain of colour in illustration and visual culture through a series of exercises and projects. Starting with the roots of colour theory and its practical applications, terms and guidelines, the course material will gradually move towards an experiential and ecological approach to colour perception and use. Through readings and presentations, students will also reflect on the aesthetic, cultural and philosophical meaning of colour and its use in a variety of contexts such as graphic novels, scientific illustration, film, animation, art, advertising, etc.

ILUS 208 SU02 – Illustration Process: Topic (3)

Tuesday and Thursdays, 1:00pm – 4:00pm, (Term 2)

Instructor: Jesse Garbe

Topic: Colour

Colour is versatile and varied. It can be used to understand the visual world, alter perception, and promote complex, contradictory and interrelated ideas. In fact, the average human eye is estimated to be able to see approximately 1 million variations of colour. In other words, your favorite red and a friend’s favorite red could be thousands of shades apart. With this in mind, students will explore the broad terrain of colour in illustration and visual culture through a series of exercises and projects. Starting with the roots of colour theory and its practical applications, terms and guidelines, the course material will gradually move towards an experiential and ecological approach to colour perception and use. Through readings and presentations, students will also reflect on the aesthetic, cultural and philosophical meaning of colour and its use in a variety of contexts such as graphic novels, scientific illustration, film, animation, art, advertising, etc.

ILUS 306 SU01A – Illustration Practices: Topics (6)

Tuesday and Thursdays, 9:00am – 4:00pm, (Term 2)

Instructor: Rachelle Sawatsky

Topic: Printmaking for Painters

This studio course will focus on developing work at the intersection of printmaking and painting in relationship to discourses in the field of contemporary art. The course will consist of three parts: short open-ended assignments that approach printmaking in relation to different processes and concepts; an emphasis on the development of self-directed paintings that employ printmaking techniques; alongside technical demonstrations, readings, and discussions with the intention of bringing forth multiple perspectives on contemporary painting and printmaking practices. Technical demonstrations will include CMYK printing and digital and analog techniques for creating screens. Students are expected to present new work for their critiques and tutorials, participate in class discussions, and be well prepared to use their tutorials and their studio and lab time wisely.

INDD 350 SU01 – Topics in Industrial Design (3)

Mondays + Wednesdays, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Aaron Oussoren

Topic: Glass Casting

This course explores emergent methods of glass production as they relate to the contemporary object and sculpture. Projects will explore and incorporate digital fabrication methods in relation to traditional glassforming processes. Students will gain a general understanding of a range of glass forming techniques, 3D printing processes, and CAD modelling. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the limitations and opportunities of implementing glass workflows within their practice. Projects will be self-directed within the pragmatic constraints of the class. Participation in group activities such as demonstrations, critiques and lectures is expected.

Note: Approximately half of the classes are held off-campus at Terminal City Glass Co-op, near Clark + Parker st.

Note: There is a studio fee of $325 attached to this course.

MHIS 327 SU01 – Studies in Animation History (3)

Mondays + Wednesdays, 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Rubén Möller

Topic: The Art of Seeing Puppet Animation

This course creates a discourse around interpretive methods of Puppet animation. Through the noted works of Jan Švankmajer, a new surrealist aestheticism through Post-Modernist animation participates in an academic dialogue of how production methods of this style evolve into a contemporary cinema language.  From the historic influences of Jiří Trnka, through to the inspiration of the UK animation of the Quay Brothers, and further to the current influence on modern cinema, Švankmajer is unprecedented in creating provocative social, political, and psychological themes that present the groundwork for a blend of fantasy and mysticism in the niche of poetic animation.

PNTG 315 SU01A – Painting Practices: Topic (6)

Tuesday and Thursdays, 9:00am – 4:00pm, (Term 2)

Instructor: Rachelle Sawatsky

Topic: Printmaking for Painters

This studio course will focus on developing work at the intersection of printmaking and painting in relationship to discourses in the field of contemporary art. The course will consist of three parts: short open-ended assignments that approach printmaking in relation to different processes and concepts; an emphasis on the development of self-directed paintings that employ printmaking techniques; alongside technical demonstrations, readings, and discussions with the intention of bringing forth multiple perspectives on contemporary painting and printmaking practices. Technical demonstrations will include CMYK printing and digital and analog techniques for creating screens. Students are expected to present new work for their critiques and tutorials, participate in class discussions, and be well prepared to use their tutorials and their studio and lab time wisely.

PRNT 307 SU01A – Print Media Practices: Topic (6)

Tuesday and Thursdays, 9:00am – 4:00pm, (Term 2)

Instructor: Rachelle Sawatsky

Topic: Printmaking for Painters

This studio course will focus on developing work at the intersection of printmaking and painting in relationship to discourses in the field of contemporary art. The course will consist of three parts: short open-ended assignments that approach printmaking in relation to different processes and concepts; an emphasis on the development of self-directed paintings that employ printmaking techniques; alongside technical demonstrations, readings, and discussions with the intention of bringing forth multiple perspectives on contemporary painting and printmaking practices. Technical demonstrations will include CMYK printing and digital and analog techniques for creating screens. Students are expected to present new work for their critiques and tutorials, participate in class discussions, and be well prepared to use their tutorials and their studio and lab time wisely.

SOCS 300 SU01 – Studies in the Social Sciences (3)

Wednesdays + Fridays, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Jeffery Swartz

Topic: Barcelona, Supermodel

This course examines the identity and transformation of contemporary cities, focussing on Barcelona as a case study. Drawing from theory in history, architecture, urban planning and sociology, while exploring cultural content in art, design, literature and film, the course lays out a broad set of parameters with which to analyze urban change in the era of globalization, immigration, mass tourism and international finance.

Barcelona has emerged in the past three decades as an emblem of urban transformation. This has often been met with innovative or radical responses, from squatting and other social movements to the recent push for Catalonian independence. Massive alterations in public space and neighbourhood services, featuring strong design and architectural values, have been the contemporary complement to the restoration of historical heritage, including Roman, Gothic and art nouveau. As with many urban centres, major international events (the 1992 Olympics) have been used to drive broader change while garnering social consensus (conjuring parallels with Vancouver).

By the late 20th century Barcelona was being lauded as a model to be copied, a valid reference for change. Simultaneously, however, the city’s brand identity would be questioned by sectors of its own society: discussion of gentrification, residents’ rights, sustainable growth and historical memory have brought many to question this way of managing the transformation of a city. In effect, debates over urban models expose discrepancies about social values and public ethics. What does it mean to evolve from a position of relative anonymity to the status of a “supermodel”, as Italian architecture theorist Alessandro Scarnato has called Barcelona in a recent essay?

This course engages contemporary reflection on the city with a mind to enhancing students’ understanding of what it means to be an engaged cultural agent in an urban setting. A diverse selection of source material, including theory, history, fiction and film, will be provided by the instructor.

WRTG 201 SU01 – Writing Across the Arts (3)

Tuesdays + Thursdays, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm Summer 2018

Instructor: Tara Wren

Topic: Maker Culture

We are bombarded daily with messages imploring and commanding us to buy things, not just because we might need them, but because they promise to make us cooler, or better, or more enviable people. It's not just do you use an iPhone or an android, but are you an iPhone or android person? Dissatisfied with this consumer culture, some are coalescing around a maker culture.

Maker culture isn't just about making things - it's about making things you are not good at making. We so often focus on gaining knowledge and expertise in just a few areas - but what happens when we make things we are decidedly NOT expert at?

Students will plan and make something they have never made before (cupcakes? a videogame? a shirt? a map? a watch? perfume?). They will document and share their process and project with the class, then consider their experience as an inexpert maker.

This class is suitable for students at all levels who wants to improve their critical reading and writing skills or engage with the above topic. Readings will be drawn from both design and visual arts perspectives.