Special Topics for Summer 2016 and Fall 2016

Special Topics 

Please note: this page will be updated as information is confirmed. In case of a discrepancy between this page and InsideEC, the information on InsideEC will be deemed correct.

  • Additional information on these courses is available at https://inside.ecuad.ca
  • Most credit courses have prerequisites that are clearly outlined on the website.

Fall 2016

AHIS 328 F001 - Studies in the Global Modernism (3)

Mondays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Fall 2016

Instructor: Sadira Rodrigues

Topic: The Museum as Symptom: Framing the “Other” in Exhibition Practice

Museums since the 19th century have played an important role in how cultures and peoples from across the globe have been framed and represented in Western society. Many of the stereotypes that we retain today about other cultures have found their roots in the art and exhibitions of museums and their colonial histories. This course will look at museums and examine the ways in which their exhibitions and collections practices are part of the complex framing of other cultures. We will study the museum as a space of ritual, national identity formation and post-colonial imagination. In particular, we will examine the museum as a site of “cultural brokering”, where the representation of cultures is often through a western, Eurocentric lens. We will also examine exhibitions that also attempt to challenge the limitations of this model. In particular we will look at 1989 as a point of rupture, when a shift towards globalization marked the beginnings of new ways of framing the “other”. Through an examination of key texts and exhibitions from across the disciplines students will discuss issues pertaining to cultural practices in post-colonial and settler colonial situations. These issues include nation and nationalism, modernism(s) in the West and elsewhere, ethnicity, Indigeneity, diaspora, identity, authenticity, hybridity, culture and tradition.

AHIS 333 F001 - F003 - Interdisciplinary Forums (3)

Wednesdays, 4:30pm – 7:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Randy Lee Cutler

Topic: Chroma

Through the convergence of diverse perspectives this course considers the art and politics of colour in the construction of aesthetic forms, philosophical phenomena and scientific artifacts. Whether thought of as chroma, colour or pigment, their affective and symbolic intensities offer us poetic access into historical and contemporary modes of aesthetic engagement. Thinking across and between artistic practices how does colour carry meaning particularly in how it manifests emotional and cultural differences? And how do visual experiments with a focus on colour whether light, hue or saturation draw and enlarge on artistic practices? Within this framework, the instructor's lectures are complimented by visiting speakers and media presentations providing an exploration into the performance of colour in our daily lives. 

AHIS 404 F001 – Art Now: Topics in Contemporary Art (3)

Fridays, 1pm – 3:50pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Patrik Andersson

Topic: Art in Vancouver: 1970 to the Present

Art Now: Topics in Contemporary Art is a senior academic seminar aimed at introducing students to current issues in contemporary art. The Spring 2015 session is titled Art in Vancouver: 1970 to the Present and will focus on artists, art and institutions that have helped make Vancouver’s art scene what it is today. This review is aimed at initiating an in-depth discussion of the role local art has played within national and global discourses while grounded in regional politics and aesthetics. In this way, the course is provides a select historical and contemporary geography of Vancouver’s art scene that should be useful in asking questions about the state of local and global contemporary art.  The course requires students to participate in class room discussions and numerous field trips to galleries and museums where they will not only look at art but meet people working behind the scene.

CCID 200 F001A and CCID 300 F001A – Community Projects (3)

Thursdays, 12:30pm – 3:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Holly Schmidt

Topic: Community, Collaboration & Pedagogy

Irit Rogoff’s 2008 essay, Turning brought attention to contemporary artistic and curatorial practices that take up the purpose, methods and spaces of education. This course will examine the work of artists, curators and educators who have sought out the emergent potential of pedagogical practices including: Pablo Helguera, Harrel Fletcher, and Jen Delos Reyes. Through readings, dialogue and creative practice we will explore the productive overlap between education, art and curatorial practices as they are performed inside and outside of institutional contexts such as the gallery, classroom and community centre.

This course will be held in the event space of the Contemporary Art Gallery, a public art gallery dedicated to the exhibition of national and international contemporary visual art and the commissioning of socially engaged projects through the Field House Artist-in-Residence. The context of the gallery and residency offers opportunities to engage with gallery staff, local and visiting artists, and partner organizations in order to develop a nuanced understanding of the pedagogical possibilities in contemporary art. The course will culminate in a collaborative student-led event for the public.

CCID 202 F001C and CCID 302 F001C - Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Wednesdays, 1pm – 3:50pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Cameron Cartiere

Topic: Open Studio

This class is designed as an open studio, so students will be able to work directly on their own practice. The outcomes for each student will be determined individually with the instructor depending on the scope and scale of each project proposed.  Some projects may be able to reach full realization, others may result in extensive research and a proposal for execution. Students will have an opportunity to test ideas, meet artists in the field, and participate on external projects.

The class will take place at the Oak Park Field House near the Oakridge/Marpole Community Centre (59th & Oak). The field house is part of the Vancouver Parks Department’s Artists Studio project.

CRAM 204 F001L and CRAM 304 F001L – Ceramics Special Topic (3)

Wednesdays, 1pm-3:50pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: TBA

Topic: Digital Methods for Ceramics

This special topics course provides a broad investigation into the creative use of new digital technologies and their relationship to contemporary surface and form. Assigned projects will explore various strategies for the creation and combination of 2D surface pattern and 3D form via a range of output technologies (decal printers, laser cutters, 3D printers). We will explore how the creative integration of digital technologies can provide for multiple new opportunities and efficiencies within personal expression.
Note: The intent of this course is to develop broad competencies with digital methods and outputs as they relate to contemporary ceramic practice; however, we will be working only indirectly with ceramic material.

CRAM 303 F002K– Ceramic Practices: Topics (6)

Mondays, 1pm – 7:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Justin Novak

Topic: Toys and Figurines
This course will explore the potential of iconography and allegory in contemporary figures, as we examine the phenomenon of "Designer Toys". Students will use ceramic processes to explore creative strategies common to “Urban Vinyl”, a subversive genre that has merged traditional character design and merchandising with artistic expression from a wide range of underground subcultures. Although the class is largely devoted to sculptural form and surface decoration, there will be opportunities to develop broader strategies through the creation of accompanying labels, literature, web graphics and packaging. Cross-listed as an Illustration course as well as a Ceramics offering, the intention is to bring together a diversity of skills and approaches in a collaborative learning environment. Those enrolled as CRAM-303 students will bring experience with ceramic materials and 3D methods, while the ILUS-306 students will bring graphic sensibilities which will aid in the creation of vibrant surface designs.

CRAM 303 F001F – Ceramic Practices: Topics (6)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 3:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Julie York

Topic: Art and Anthropology: Cultural Makers

This special topic class is designed for students interested in creating ceramics at the intermediate and advanced level, through researching subjects that surround cultural anthropology.  This class will investigate the collection at the UBC Museum of Anthropology (“MOA”) through various lectures and museum visits.  A variety of material techniques and processes related to ceramics will be covered in response to ideas surrounding the field of anthropology and museum ideologies.  The specific collection at the MOA will be the starting point for creative practices to emerge using the material of ceramics.

The class will involve hands-on studio work.  Students are expected to keep an open mind with regard to problem solving and to challenge themselves in all areas of research, skill building, and experimentation. The class will encourage self-directed growth, to prepare students to find their own practices.  Both sculptural and functional practices are welcome.

FVIM 416 F001 - Special Topics in Integrated Media (3)

Fridays, 1pm – 3:50pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Julie Andreyev

Topic: Media Ecologies

Are you an animal, plant, and microbe enthusiast? Are you interested in the forces of the Earth and how they intra-relate with your day to day actions? Do you want to expand more-than-human being into your media practice? This course is for artists who want to foster their creativity through ways of seeing the world as a place of flourishing for all beings. The course focuses on contemporary thought and media practices that explore more-than-human creativity, and human and nonhuman intra-creativity—creative making with other species. The course offers exercises in expanding perception through sensing and making in the field and in the studio. Students are encouraged to experiment with how creative processes contribute to ecological awareness. The course includes lectures, readings, discussions and exercises. Students will be asked to create a project in the medium of their choice—film, video, sound, text, installation, web, performance, projection, photography, etc.—based on the ideas, sensings and materials offered in the course. Students may use this course to inform their graduating project. This course is open all students in the University who have completed second year.

HUMN 311 F001 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Mondays, 8:30am-11:20am, Fall 2016

Instructor: Kathy Slade

Topic: The Practice of Artists' Publishing
This course will focus on artists’ publishing projects from the 1960’s to the present. Through a series of readings, group presentations, and assignments we will investigate the roll of publishing within a wider art context and consider its structure and position in relationship to the legacy of conceptual art practices. The scope of study will focus primarily on artists’ books, but will also consider journals, magazines, and web projects published by artists. This course will provide students with the opportunity to develop and produce a publication and research and develop an exhibition.

HUMN 311 F002 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Tuesdays, 12:30pm-3:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Alex Philips

Topic: Sculpture and the Ethnographic Turn

This course examines “the ethnographic turn” in contemporary art and its implications for sculpture, the visual arts, curators, and exhibition designers. The phrase “ethnographic turn” refers to a movement in contemporary art whereby artists have adopted the methodologies of ethnographic collecting and display developed by anthropologists. The artistic use of social scientific methods parallels the recognition within postmodern anthropology that its documents too are cultural products. By turning a mirror on the methodologies of museum collecting and display, artists have been critiquing the operations of power in and outside these institutions.The course will survey such issues as the acquisition and display of cultural artifacts, the critique of social scientific authority, the history of exhibit design, the tension between the real and the represented, and the role of artists as participant-observers in the field of anthropology. Artists whose work will be reviewed include Joseph Beuys, Fred Wilson, Louise Lawler, Mark Dion, Andrea Fraser, Sam Durant, Lothar Baumgarten, Iris Haussler, Juan Munoz, Kent Monkman, and Liz Magor, among others. The course includes readings in art history, anthropology, and museology, field trips to selected exhibitions, and a sustained studio project or research paper. This course is suitable for students in Visual Art, Curatorial Studies, or Exhbition Design.

HUMN 311 F003 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Tuesdays, 12:30pm – 3:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Cameron Cartiere

Topic: Community-Based Environmental Art

(this course would be cross-listed with UBC Okanagan and co-taught with Nancy Holmes – each week graduate students from UBCO will be video-conferencing in for a 2 hour overlap to engage with ECU students)

This course will focus on theories and practices of community-based environmental art, which can include community arts and eco-activism as well as community-specific art practices. The course will focus on the social responsibility of artists and the relevance of art to society.  The course will discuss trends in a variety of art practices (writing, visual art, film, performance) that reframe art as a method for community groups and activists to explore and engage with contemporary societal issues regarding the environment, as well as a method for artists to contribute original approaches to these issues.  The course aims to define, theorize and critically engage with the growing body of work in this area, including artistic case studies and documentation, critical and theoretical debates, and application of this theory by engaging in a large, multi-city ecoart project.

HUMN 311 F004 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Thursdays, 8:30am-11:20am, Fall 2016

Instructor: Jay White

Topic: Art and the Anthropocene
“The Anthropocene" is a contested term for the current geological era of planet Earth. The term describes contemporary human impact on the planet's geology and ecosystems as so vast that it will be recorded in the geological record of the planet. In response to the escalating concern over climate change and irreversible ecological transformation, the human species is finding itself tasked with massive challenges in responding to events that might not be immediately apparent in our everyday lived experience. For many of us, this call-to-action coincides with a need to radically transform the ways we perceive and act as global citizens and human subjects.
This course will examine the ways that contemporary artists respond to a situation where humans find ourselves decentred, de-prioritized, and entangled in uncertain and potentially dangerous relationships with other entities. How do we represent, translate, and relate in scales and durations that are too big or small for our sensing bodies to perceive? As thinking, feeling cultural producers, how can we respond to this potentially catastrophic situation? What new definitions of 'life' emerge when we reconsider our relationships with other people, species, phenomena and objects?
Through readings, field work, writing, discussions and individual projects, we will attempt to integrate and consider these urgent issues in our own practices.

HUMN 311 F090 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Online course, Fall 2016

Instructor: Merritt Johnson

Topic: Visibility and Invisibility: land, body, culture, nation, aesthetic, past present future
Visibility and invisibility contain everything. Everything is either seen physically, or is metaphorically through knowing/understanding/acknowledgement; or unseen (unacknowledged/known/understood).
This course will use sight and vision, the visible and the invisible as a way of exploring art making in relation to land, body, culture, nation, aesthetic, and the mutability of sight through time. The instructor will contribute from her own area of practice, as a cross-disciplinary artist and introduce artworks, and readings that are relevant to contemporary practice in North America including but not limited to Indigenous perspectives.
Students will further explore their own diverse practices in connection to visibility and invisibility. The possibility to expand the topic and create connections between varied forms of practice and areas of interest and applicability are vast and encouraged.
Students of all backgrounds are welcomed to work within and across any discipline including but not limited to: drawing, painting, print, sculpture, installation, sound, video, performance, photography, web-based, social practice, and collaboration.

ILUS 208 F001 – Illustration Process: Topic (3)

Wednesdays, 8:30am-11:20am, Fall 2016

Instructor: Neil Wedman

Topic: Life Drawing for Narrative

Essential to all narrative is the presence of an animate figure –either human or human like- whose actions and volitions propels the story and lends it personality.  In illustration these figures often carry the likenesses of their character traits in their physiognomy and bearing. Basic skills of observation and making drawings from life enhance a person’s ability to render such characters with subtlety, incisiveness and individuality.  This course provides each student and opportunity to study anatomy, gesture, portraiture, caricature and costume from models in the studio and other sources with an explicit concern for the portrayal of narrative and, of course, expand their life drawing skills in general.     

ILUS 208 F002 – Illustration Process: Topic (3)

Wednesdays, 7pm-9:50pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: YeonJung Kim

Topic: Digital Illustration

This course will introduce students to professional issues and practices in the world of illustration through the relationship between traditional and digital media. Students will be working on a range of assignments and tutorials that will include illustrating for specific audiences as well as developing work for their portfolios. The goal of this class is for the student to be able to develop creative concepts, investigate problem solving and communicate them successfully to the viewer.

ILUS 305 F001 – Illustration Genres: Topic (3)

Mondays, 8:30am-3:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Robin Mitchell-Cranfield

Topic: Design for Illustration

This practical course is designed for illustration students who would like to have a better understanding of design and art-direction. Students will learn how to develop their practice with a better understanding of art direction, typography, and production. This course will leave students more prepared for real-world projects. Small assignments throughout the term will allow student to explore communication design through illustration. Students will complete a term project designed to enhance their portfolio.

ILUS 305 F002 – Illustration Genres: Topics (3)

Thursdays, 8:30am-11:20am, Fall 2016

Instructor: Miriam Libicki

Topic: Comics and Identity

With examples from MAUS to FUN HOME to AMERICAN BORN CHINESE and ARAB OF THE FUTURE, comix have proven a powerful and popular vehicle for examining identities. Comix contain both visual and verbal rhetorical strategies, and are ideally positioned, in the internet age, to communicate unmediated across geography and culture. In this class we’ll explore both the potentials and the problems of cartooning the Self and cartooning the Other.

ILUS 306 F001 - Illustration Practices: Topics (6)

Fridays, 8:30am – 3:50pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Jesse Garbe

Topic: Illustration in the Anthropocene
The term Anthropocene designates the time when human activities started to significantly impact our ecological and geological systems. In popular use it has become associated with the processes of climate change, habitat destruction and the loss of biodiversity on the planet earth. It is truly a global movement and evidence for it can be found in the sediment and ice core samples dating back to the mid-20th century. But how does one react to this grand event within the discipline of illustration? In this course we will be exploring how illustrators can participate in these conversations. We will also be investigating the role that images have in our culture and their ability to challenge, educate and display ecological issues.

ILUS 306 F002K – Illustration Practices: Topics (6)

Mondays, 1pm – 7:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Justin Novak

Topic: Toys and Figurines

This course will explore the potential of iconography and allegory in contemporary figures, as we examine the phenomenon of "Designer Toys". Students will use ceramic processes to explore creative strategies common to ?Urban Vinyl?, a subversive genre that has merged traditional character design and merchandising with artistic expression from a wide range of underground subcultures. Although the class is largely devoted to sculptural form and surface decoration, there will be opportunities to develop broader strategies through the creation of accompanying labels, literature, web graphics and packaging. Cross-listed as an Illustration course as well as a Ceramics offering, the intention is to bring together a diversity of skills and approaches in a collaborative learning environment. Those enrolled as CRAM-303 students will bring experience with ceramic materials and 3D methods, while the ILUS-306 students will bring graphic sensibilities which will aid in the creation of vibrant surface designs.

ILUS 306 F003N – Illustration Practices: Topic (6)

Tuesdays, 8:30am-3:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Nick Conbere

Topic: Narrative Etching

Artists and illustrators have traditionally used etching as a subtle and versatile medium for creating rich images and small editions. In this cross-listed Print Media and Illustration course, students will explore narrative content through etching and related print media techniques.

The course will provide opportunities for depicting and interpreting ideas, and artworks could range from short, fictional comics to conceptual investigations of narrative imagery. Students will learn a variety of techniques for producing monochromatic and multi-colour prints. Print processes may be used in conjunction with drawing, digital media and other media as desired. This class is open to all students regardless of previous print media experience, accommodating beginning and advanced skills. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of contemporary narrative ideas as students explore meanings, complexities, and applications of their subject matter.

INDD 330 F001F – Ceramics: Advanced (6)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 3:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Julie York

Topic: Art and Anthropology: Cultural Makers

This special topic class is designed for students interested in creating ceramics at the intermediate and advanced level, through researching subjects that surround cultural anthropology.  This class will investigate the collection at the UBC Museum of Anthropology (“MOA”) through various lectures and museum visits.  A variety of material techniques and processes related to ceramics will be covered in response to ideas surrounding the field of anthropology and museum ideologies.  The specific collection at the MOA will be the starting point for creative practices to emerge using the material of ceramics.

The class will involve hands-on studio work.  Students are expected to keep an open mind with regard to problem solving and to challenge themselves in all areas of research, skill building, and experimentation. The class will encourage self-directed growth, to prepare students to find their own practices.  Both sculptural and functional practices are welcome.

MHIS 329 F001 – Studies in Current Film/Video (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30am-11:20am and Wednesdays, 7:30pm-9:30pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Alla Gadassik

Topic: History of Cinematography

This upper-level course considers the history of cinematography as both a history of specific technological innovations and as a history of various filmmaking philosophies. We will investigate the early development of key cinematography tools and techniques, by placing them in the context of various industries that employed and promoted different shooting styles. Topics will include less‐known histories, such as the camera's role in modern science and warfare, but also more dominant histories, such as the standardization of cinematography in mainstream studio filmmaking. In the process, we will trace the camera's many incarnations as a storyteller, a bodily prosthetic, a weapon, a scientific device, and even an autonomous agent with its own identity. We will also ask what cinematography might mean without a “camera,” both in cameraless animation and in contemporary CGI cinematography. Students are expected to attend weekly lectures and a separate weekly screening; complete independent readings; and conduct guided research toward a final project. Assignments will include shorter papers, an in-class final test, and a final paper or video-essay that will require outside research. Students should have some knowledge of formal film vocabulary and formal analysis, as covered in MHIS205. Please note that screenings will include potentially sensitive, upsetting, exhilarating, boring, spectacular, or puzzling material.

MHIS 429 F001 – Topics in Film/Video Theory (3)

Wednesdays, 9am-11:20am and 1pm-3:50pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Alla Gadassik

Topic: Sci-Fi Cinema and the Philosophy of Technology

This advanced course uses seminal science fiction films as case studies for exploring key texts in the philosophy of technology, with a particular emphasis on media technology. How have media technologies transformed our understanding of reality? What is the relationship between organic and artificial organisms, or between natural and human-made environments? How do people imagine the media of the future, and what do those imagined futures reveal about their own cultural and social context? These crucial questions preoccupied media philosophers for over a century, and they are also questions that preoccupy many pioneering science fiction films. Every week students will tackle key texts by media theorists (eg. Marshall McLuhan; Vivian Sobchack) or philosophers of technology (eg. Jacques Ellul; Donna Harraway) alongside influential essays on science-fiction cinema (eg. Susan Sontag; J.P. Telotte). Required weekly screenings will be followed by short lectures, student presentations, and class discussion of the weekly topic. Assignments may include weekly short written responses, reading quizzes, individual presentations, and a final paper or video essay. Over the course of the semester students will advance their reading, writing, and critical inquiry skills; practice their discussion and presentation strategies; and tackle challenging questions independently and through seminar participation.

PHOT 323 F001 – Photography Practices: Topics (6)

Fridays, 8:30am – 3:50pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Raymond Boisjoly

Topic: The Distances Between Photographs and Photographic Images
This special topics course will concern experimental approaches to image making using both analogue and digital photographic media. Departing from historical precedents such as photograms and following a trajectory encompassing other recent strategies of 'cameraless' photography in the darkroom and out, we will consider the possibilities of extra-depictive approaches, approaches not primarily concerned with the naturalistic depiction of the world, within contemporary art. A continuing discussion of the importance of both technological and conceptual developments involving photography will be used as a motivator for the production of diverse bodies of work.

PRNT 305 F003N – Print Media: Topic (6)

Tuesdays, 8:30am-3:20pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Nick Conbere

Topic: Narrative Etching

Artists and illustrators have traditionally used etching as a subtle and versatile medium for creating rich images and small editions. In this cross-listed Print Media and Illustration course, students will explore narrative content through etching and related print media techniques.

The course will provide opportunities for depicting and interpreting ideas, and artworks could range from short, fictional comics to conceptual investigations of narrative imagery. Students will learn a variety of techniques for producing monochromatic and multi-colour prints. Print processes may be used in conjunction with drawing, digital media and other media as desired. This class is open to all students regardless of previous print media experience, accommodating beginning and advanced skills. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of contemporary narrative ideas as students explore meanings, complexities, and applications of their subject matter.

SCLP 312 F001 – Sculpture: Special Topics (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Fall 2016

Instructor: Laura Piasta

Topic: Process

Through projects, discussions, readings and presentations this studio course will explore the notion of process in the context of contemporary sculpture practice. The projects developed for this course will be self-directed through material driven explorations, conceptual frameworks and or performative gestures. This course will focus on studio practice, studio visits and class critiques as well as visits to current exhibitions.

SOCS 300 F001 – Studies in the Social Sciences (3)

Thursdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Fall 2016

Instructor: Elizabeth Lee

Topic: Public Life: Critical Dialogues on Race, Art and Politics

This course asks us to think critically about the complex relations between social groups and design landscapes so as to help us explore difficult questions about space and power. How do gender, race, sexuality, class and other social forms of differentiation intersect to constitute particular spaces, places, and boundaries? And, how are these spaces, places, and boundaries mobilized to justify geographies of exclusion of varying scope and scale? We will contemplate such questions in order to understand more fully and to address more responsibly a range of contemporary issues, including the continuing gender inequality in higher education and the racial politics of recent immigration policies. We will turn our attention to the city – as a contradictory site of both cosmopolitan hope and anti-social intolerance – to think more deeply about the dynamic links between the production of robust public space and the pursuit of engaged public life.

SOCS 300 F090 – Studies in the Social Sciences (3)

Online course, Fall 2016

Instructor: Sadira Rodrigues

Topic: Retreating To/From
This online course will look at forms of retreat as gestures of resistance. To retreat communicates agency through radical refusal - and retracting can be a powerful act of turning away from society. While often associated with self-alienation and passivity, this course will explore the positive intents of agency, challenge and refusal that can inform the act of retreat. We will explore the various forms that retreat can take – whether in the act of walking, in the gesture of exclusion, the undertaking of a residency or in the consideration of slowness. This course will be part theory and part practice. We will begin by looking at texts, projects, artistic practices and ideas on practices of retreat, and then you will create a retreat – conceptualize it, experience it, think through it, and reflect on its workings.

VAST 320 F001P – VAST 420 F001P – Visual Arts Thematic I & II (6)

Tuesdays, 12:30pm – 6:40pm, Fall 2016

Instructor: Ingrid Koenig

Topic: Black Holes and Other Entanglements in the Studio

This interdisciplinary studio course uses science as a lens through which to view and speak about the current world and invisible forces of the known universe, and interacts with these perspectives in the context of art practice. Students investigate and experiment with conceptual and material transformations that arise from being inspired, informed and mystified by phenomena in physics and other probing areas. The breadth of scientific fields to be encountered will depend on students’ individual research interests, while weekly topics address themes such as quantum particle behavior, biology and new materialism. The narrative of science contextualized in human experience, the abstract, embodied, misinterpreted, the complex rhizome, construction of knowledge, play of metaphor, connectivity, uncertainty, energy transformation, entropy, chaos theory, dark matter – these are all subjects for studio entanglements.

Students will participate in the Artist-in-Residence Program at TRIUMF, (Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics with its cyclotron particle accelerator). They will also have a studio day at the Beaty Biodiversity Museum.