SPACE Minor

Social Practice + Community Engagement (SPACE) Minor

Social Practice + Community Engagement (SPACE) is an interdisciplinary minor housed within the Faculty of Culture + Community, for students in any Degree program, which allows them to focus on social practice, ecology and sustainability, documentary practices or community projects as a Minor for their degree. As part of the SPACE Minor, students will have the opportunity to engage with real world issues and problems through applied art, media and design. The SPACE Minor will create bridges and engage students with citizen groups, industry, non-profit organizations, arts groups, the public school system and other related organizations.

 

 

 

 

The three required courses for the SPACE Minor, provide an ethical framework for community engagement that will assist students in internships and external collaboration of all kinds, and provide an overall context for social practices. The Faculty of Culture + Community will draw credits from existing courses in all undergraduate degrees that fit the mandate of the minor. (Total credits for Minor: 18)

Required Courses (9 credits)

SOCS 302  – Ethics of Representation (3 cr)
HUMN 304 Social Practice Seminar (3 cr)
CCID 200 / CCID 300 – Community Projects (3 cr); or
CCID 201 / CCID 301 – SPACE: Special Topics (3 cr); or
CCID 202 / CCID 302 – Fieldwork: Topics (3 cr)

Elective Credits

Student's choice of 9 credits from the student's declared major (which excludes Foundation requirements but can include additional CCID courses as open electives) which have (potential for) active synergies with SPACE learning objectives, to be presented to and approved by feedback and review panel composed of SPACE faculty which convenes once each Fall and Spring.

Click here for current CCID special topic courses

 

Previous SPACE Minor CCID Community Project Courses + Partnerships 

CCID 201 S001B + CCID 301 S001B – Social Practice + Community Engagement (3)

Wednesdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2017

Instructor: Justin Langlois

Topic: LandMarks 2017

This course will run as an innovative partnership, linking students to a nationally synchronized set of courses and exhibitions exploring critical themes related to present-day environmental and climatic crises, the legacies of colonialism, and the complex relationship between nationhood and cultural identity.

Landmarks are meeting places. They can be features of the landscape—a tree, a mountain, a waterway, a boulder—or part of the built environment. The land is marked by time, by the elements, by the habits of animals and peoples. Landmarks define boundaries and echo multiple histories, stories and beliefs. They give shape to our collective memories. A landmark is a turning point and a legacy for future generations. Landmarks help us find our way. To mark is to act.

LandMarks: Art + Places + Perspectives is a network of collaborative, contemporary art projects across Parks Canada places during the 150th year of Canadian Confederation. 2017 marks an occasion to reflect on a much older land, and to address our relationship with nature in the face of present-day environmental and climatic crises, the legacies of colonialism, and the complex relationship between nationhood and cultural identity. Using art as a catalyst for discourse and social change, LandMarks looks forward, and provides an opportunity to imagine, to speculate, and to invent our futures through the eyes of artists, art students, communities, and through the spirit of the land.

This course will introduce students to a wide range of contemporary practitioners, critical perspectives, and opportunities for creating new artwork in public spaces. Students will have unprecedented access and resources to curators, professional artists, and opportunities for sharing their work with wider publics. Beyond the 2017 Spring semester, CCID 201/301: LandMarks will also continue with a follow-up offering in the Summer 2017 to allow students the opportunity to participate in an exhibition as part of the larger LandMarks initiative.  Students taking the course in Spring 2017 are highly encouraged but not required to commit to the second leg in Term 1 of Summer 2017, and new students can join the iteration in Summer 2017 without having taken the first leg in Spring 2017 but will be required to catch up with interim conclusions before starting the Summer course.

CCID 202 S001D + CCID 302 S001D – Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Thursdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2017

Instructor: Cameron Cartiere

Topic: Public Art & Social Practice on Main Street: From Here to There 

This CCID practice-based course offers students an opportunity to engage in coursework focused on embedded practice that includes an off-site fieldwork experience. The semester will focus on testing the working draft Mount Pleasant Community Art Plan using temporary public art events and social practice interventions in the MPBIA district. The class would spend the semester examining the Mount Pleasant BIA district of Main St.

Students will create their own practice-based project proposals based on site research, cultural context, and independent studio work. This is an opportunity to develop practical experience working in the public realm and to explore new approaches for understanding audience, engagement, and negotiation.

Through class lectures and fieldtrips, students will be engaged with various stakeholders including the Mount Pleasant business owners, local artists and designers, city officials, community members, and public art experts.

This course is open to students in any degree program and any major.

CCID 300 S040Y – Community Projects & HUMN 311 S040Y – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Thursdays, 1pm – 3:50pm, Spring 2017 at North Island College

Hybrid course – face-to-face with an online component

Instructor: Prav Pillay & Sarah Van Borek

Topic: Shared Histories, Imagined Futures & The Culture of Possibility: A Canada-South Africa Co-production

In this unique and dynamic program in partnership with RAVEN (Respecting Aboriginal Values and Environmental Needs)[1], students will collaborate with 4th year visual art students based at the University of Johannesburg to produce an exhibition that will take place simultaneously in South Africa and Canada and have a virtual component and interaction between the exhibition spaces and student artists. Work produced will explore connections between peoples, place, land, environment and resources. This project is an exploration of how, by sharing dialogue, storytelling and creative collaboration in an educational context, we can build a new culture of possibility in the “space” that is not defined by geographical borders, language or cultural differences, or limitations of the past.

This course is primarily face-to-face with an online component. Student groups in both Canada and South Africa will follow a parallel process that includes dialogue and creative exchange with each other (both online and through real-time video conferencing), field trips to intercultural green spaces, interviews with community members, and explorations in concepts of Site/Non-Site, Radical Cartography and Acoustic Ecology. The result will be collaborative works that may involve a range of mediums and take various forms. The course will culminate in an exhibit launch and public engagement event at the Courtenay & District Museum. There may be an opportunity for students who successfully complete this program to be hired as professional artists in a second phase of this project to take place later in 2017. Students from all disciplines are encouraged to apply.


[1] RAVEN is a non-profit charitable organization that provides financial resources to assist Aboriginal Nations within Canada in lawfully forcing industrial development to be reconciled with their traditional ways of life, and in a manner that addresses global warming or other ecological sustainability challenges. http://raventrust.com/

Please note: this is a hybrid CCID 300 & HUMN 311 course. Students registered in CCID 300 will be expected to demonstrate a greater scope of artistic production. Students registered in HUMN 311 will be expected to demonstrate a greater scope of arts-based research and produce a process essay to support the artwork produced.

CCID 201 S002C and CCID 301 S002C – Social Practice + Community Engagement (3)

Fridays, 1pm – 3:50pm, Spring 2017

Instructor: Hannah Jickling and Helen Reed

Topic: Big Rock Candy Mountain: Tastemakers
Is there a way to work within the tentative areas of youthful self-definition to access new aesthetic terrain? What happens when we re-frame children as tastemakers rather than consumers? Is there is a place where adult rationalities might productively stretch, crack, dissolve, like taffy, like Warheads©, like Toxic Waste©??

- Quote from Big Rock Candy Mountain: The Start of Something Bigger and Something Smaller by Vanessa Kwan

This course provides students with the opportunity to learn about expanded public practice through an embedded engagement with Big Rock Candy Mountain, an ongoing public artwork produced by Other Sights For Artists? Projects. Big Rock Candy Mountain is a flavor incubator and taste-making think-tank between artists Hannah Jickling and Helen Reed and students, teachers and support staff at Queen Alexandra Elementary School in East Vancouver. The project involves candy editions, flavor-making workshops and artist talks for children. Students in this course will spend part of the semester off-campus at Queen Alex, supporting visiting artist talks and projects at the elementary school. Borrowing from educational models and participatory methodologies, in both current and historical art practices, this is a course for any student looking to explore atypical contexts and embedded approaches to art-making.

Students must be able to meet off-site, at Queen Alexandra Elementary School. Police record checks must be completed at the outset of the course. As course work is coordinated with several community partners, reliability and professionalism are of the utmost importance. Absence from more than two classes will result in an automatic failure of the course.

CCID 200 F001 – Community Projects (3 Credits)

Instructor: Sam Carter

Topic: Chinatown Culture and Design, 2010 and Beyond

This course includes an exploration of Chinatown, its past, present and future. At the same time, students will prepare models and plans for a 2010 exhibitions and events presented in Chinatown.  Workshops and research will involve a diverse range of non-profit community organizations: Canadian Society for Asian Arts, Chinese Cultural Centre, Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden, Save the Children Canada, Arts Umbrella, Asia Pacific Foundation. Vancouver Chinatown-Past, Present Future, Vancouver Dance Academy and other Asian heritage and cultural organizations.

CCID 200 & 300 F002 – Community Projects (3 credits)

Topic: South Hill Art Plan

This course offers a unique opportunity to investigate socially engaged and spatial practices by working collaboratively to address community issues specific to one of Vancouver's oldest neighbourhoods, the area of South Hill. Through research, fieldwork, and multidisciplinary art production, the course connects students with residents, business owners and public agencies. Integrating theory and practice, Places, Issues and Audiences provides a broad survey of artistic practices in the public realm and the contemporary issues which makes them challenging and engaging.

CCID 200 & 300 F001 – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Sabine Silberberg

Topic: Dr Peter Aids Foundation

This course will provide students with an ethical framework and appropriate methodologies for community practice, especially in projects that involve collaboration with marginal and at-risk communities such as the DTES (Downtown Eastside) in Vancouver. As part of this class, students will have the opportunity to apply field research and have structured sessions with staff and clients at the Dr. Peter Centre West End.

The media involved in this project may be broad- a range of audio/photo/video and film, inter-media, writing, and design that will be dependent on student interest, skills and experience. One thing that art/design/media have to offer in this context are an opportunity for clients at Dr. Peter Centre to become visible, to be witnessed, seen, accepted and appreciated, to create tangible traces of their lives and to matter. Working closely with staff at Dr. Peter Centre West End, students may have the opportunity to create representations that can be used to tell life stories and that are sensitive to the needs, privacy and confidentiality of the clients that use the Centre. Stigma and marginalization affect lives – respect and ethics will inform this collaboration when negotiating the interface of visibility and overexposure.

The Dr. Peter Centre West End provides interdisciplinary health services to people who are living with HIV/AIDS. The combined Day Health Program and 24-hour nursing care Residence is unique in Canada, with an innovative, comprehensive model of care that is built on acceptance and support, helping people find strength, offering respect, dignity and a sense of belonging to people who are suffering from multiple health and social challenges.  

CCID 201 F001 & CCID 301 F001 – Community Projects (3)

Instructor: Holly Schmidt

Topic: Communities of Practice: Art and Pedagogy (in partnership with the Vancouver School Board)

This course is a 3-credit elective. This course will be offered in two distinct parts. The first part will provide 6 classes on-campus at Emily Carr Granville Island campus on Mondays 1:00-3:50pm. In the second half, students will be supported to design their own 7-week art program, which they will deliver to a small group of children in their middle-development years (ages 6-12) at a local elementary school. The work at an elementary school will take place on either a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday afternoon (3:00pm-5;30pm), depending on the students’ schedule. Youth leaders from a local secondary school will assist students in the delivery of their program.

In the Communities of Practice: Art and Pedagogy course, students will gain a theoretical understanding of the critical role art plays in the social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development of children and youth. Students will be introduced to pedagogy and methods that inform the design, delivery, and evaluation of community-based arts programming.

The Communities of Practice: Art and Pedagogy course will provide Emily Carr University students with a unique opportunity to explore how values, ethics, and assumptions shape us as artists, learners, teachers and, ultimately, as “global citizens”. The goal of this Community Service Learning course is to deepen students' civic responsibility through the provision of rich experiential learning opportunities that are intrinsically tied to academic content.

This course will be co-facilitated by: Holly Schmidt, Faculty, Emily Carr University. Dawn Whitworth, Manager Research and Industry, Emily Carr University. Marisol Petersen, Vancouver School Board Community Schools Coordinator.

Researchers and educational practitioners will be invited as guest lecturers throughout the course. Each student will be engaged in learning to teach “art literacy”; that is, how to communicate and express oneself through creative mediums. The course will be most suitable to students interested in learning how art transects the field of education, community and/or international development, health, social work, and/or child and youth care. (Please note VSB and Emily Carr retain the right, in some cases, to refuse placement).  

CCID 200 S001 & CCID 300 S001 – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructors: Susan Stewart

Topic: The Ethics of Representation

(200/300 level) is a 3-credit elective course open to students in any Emily Carr program. This course will provide students with an ethical framework and appropriate methodologies for community practice, for when students are engaged in projects that involve collaboration with marginal and at-risk communities such as those in the DTES (Downtown Eastside) of Vancouver. The course will also address ethics broadly in any art, media, or design practice where students work with other people. This will benefit students who are doing any documentary work, photography, film/video or visual art that involves working with human subjects, as well as a range of design practices that involve a client designer relationship. We will also address collaborative process and the dynamics of working within interdisciplinary, team-oriented projects.

Students will find a collaborative or community project in consultation with their instructor. Students enrolled in certain internships may be able to consolidate their project with their internship with the instructor’s approval. For students who also register for the online course: CCID, Red Tent Campaign,* they may use that project as their primary project for The Ethics in Representation course.

The media involved in this project may be broad. Students will use a range of audio/photo/video and film, inter-media, writing, and design that will be dependent on their interest, skills and experience. One thing that art/design/media has to offer in the context of collaborating with vulnerable subjects is the opportunity for under-represented communities to become visible, to be witnessed, seen, accepted and appreciated, to create tangible traces of their lives and to matter. Working closely with the instructor, students may have the opportunity to create representations that can be used to tell life stories and that are sensitive to the needs, privacy, and confidentiality of their subjects. Stigma and marginalization affect lives – respect and ethics will inform this collaboration when negotiating the interface of visibility and overexposure.

*Red Tent is an open-source campaign spearheaded by the Vancouver-based Pivot Legal Society.  Across the country, individuals and organizations have become a part of the Red Tent Campaign to work toward the common goal of a funded national housing strategy that will end homelessness and ensure secure, adequate, accessible and affordable housing for all people living in Canada. 

CCID 200 S001 & CCID 300 S090 – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructors: Natalie Doonan

Topic: Pivot Legal Society - The Red Tent Campaign

This course is a 3-credit elective open to students in any ECU program.  In this course, students will collaborate with Pivot Legal Society in their Red Tent Campaign:

Red Tent is an open source campaign spearheaded by Vancouver-based Pivot Legal Society.  Across the country, individuals and organizations have become a part of the Red Tent Campaign to work toward the common goal of a funded national housing strategy that will end homelessness and ensure secure, adequate, accessible and affordable housing for all people living in Canada.

Students will learn how to apply their unique skills as practicing artists, in working with issues of housing and homelessness.  Students will be guided through a collaborative process with Pivot Legal Society, in which they will develop a work in public space, with the goal of raising support for a Canadian National Housing Strategy.  Students enrolled in this course are strongly encouraged to register also in CCID: The Ethics of Representation, which will inform project work by providing an ethical framework and appropriate methodologies for community practice. These two courses are complementary in addressing collaborative process and the dynamics of working within interdisciplinary team oriented projects. Students enrolled in certain internships may be able to consolidate their project with their internship. Students who also register for the course: CCID: The Ethics of Representation* may use that project as their primary project for the Ethics in Representation course.

This course will provide students with methodological frameworks for public practice.   Content will focus on artists who have addressed similar concerns in public practice works, such as Rick Lowe, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Suzanne Lacy, Danielle Abrams, Laurie Jo Reynolds, Superflex, Jenny Holzer, Lucy Orta and Group Material.  There will be a weekly online component to this course, in which students will contribute to forum discussions and meet with the instructor for virtual “chats” to address issues in the alignment of art and activism, and the progress of their own projects. 

CCID 200 F001 & CCID 300 F001 - Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Sarah Van Borek

Topic: David Suzuki Foundation - Natural Capital

This is an interactive community mapping & storytelling project in partnership with Canada's leading environmental organization, the David Suzuki Foundation (DSF). Through a dynamic and collaborative approach to documentary practices, students will create a series of digital narratives for a "Natural Capital Map App" that will bring to life research DSF is launching on the 'Natural Capital' (economic value of ecosystem processes) provided by wetlands in the Vancouver region, while digging into the meaning this has for people in their day-to-day lives. These digital narratives will feature stories from diverse community members who, by sharing their unique relationships and experiences to specific wetland areas, will highlight the priceless Natural Capital of these areas. By promoting the concept of Natural Capital, this project aims to shift public consciousness towards advancing a green economy: an economy that not only considers the carbon footprint of its economic activity, but one which places the environment at the foundation of what defines and directs that economic activity. As a class, students will work together with the instructor and in consultation with DSF to determine the design and functionality of the App. The course will culminate in an exhibit, launch, artists' talk and school workshop at The Gulf of Georgia Cannery museum in BC's historic fishing village of Steveston. The Cannery is an important cultural institution with approximately 50,000 visitors annually. Students in Film/Video, Animation, Photography and Interactive Media Design are encouraged to apply for this course, although students across all disciplines are welcome.

CCID 200 F002 & CCID 300 F002 – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Duane Elverum 

Topic: City Studio

This course is a collaboration between ECUAD and CityStudio Vancouver. CityStudio is an energetic hub of learning and leadership where students from Vancouver’s 6 public post‐secondary institutions design and implement Greenest City urban sustainability projects within Vancouver’s Greenest City 2020 Action Plan, one of the most ambitious environmental stewardship programs in the world.

As the core project within Vancouver’s larger Campus‐City Collaborative (C3), CityStudio Vancouver holds classes, dialogues and events in a 4000 square foot studio on False Creek. The CityStudio program has engaged over 480 students and 18 instructors contributing over 20,000 hours of credited learning, research and action to the Greenest City program in the following 3 areas:

1. GREENEST CITY SOLUTIONS. CityStudio directly involves students in designing solutions for Vancouver’s Greenest City 2020 goals. Project work connects emerging green entrepreneurs with business leaders in order to expand the green economy.

2. STUDENT LEADERSHIP TOWARDS A GREEN ECONOMY. CityStudio is a model of innovative teaching and learning. Projects and course work emphasize mentoring and training for emerging sustainability leaders to identify and develop opportunities in the green economy.

3. ENERGETIC HUB OF GREENEST CITY LEARNING. To create an energetic hub of learning, CityStudio runs core courses, hosts events and coordinates a network of partner courses at the 6 participating universities and colleges in Vancouver.

CCID 200 S001 & CCID 300 S001 – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Cindy Mochizuki & Lois Klassen  

Topic: Archive City

This studio course offers students the opportunity to encounter and collaborate in creative projects that are situated within the city’s known and unknown collections. Where are the places that contain the city’s stories and histories? Whose voices are spoken there, and whose are silenced through those collections and archives? How do artists and designers approach and intervene in those places and with those voices? Through site visits, interviews, projects, and presentations, students will have an opportunity to propose creative projects that collaborate with official and unofficial archives and collectors. Local collections including the Vancouver Police Museum, Japanese Canadian National Museum, Crista Dahl Media Library and Archives, Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre are some of the sites of memory that will be encountered in this course. The approach that will be taken in this community projects course will situate the projects alongside the work of other artists who have intervened in public collections like Esther Chalev-Gerz (Echoes of Memory), Peter Morin (Peter Morin’s Museum), Katherine Shozawa (New Denver Memory Project), Walid Ra’ad (Atlas Group), Ilya & Emilia Kabakov, and Mark Dion. Grounded in a thorough understanding of memory and post memory, participatory art practices, and collaborative design strategies, Archive City instructors will support students as they explore the values, ethics and aesthetics of creative work that draws on public and private stories and collections.  This course could result in a curated web project that will house a digital archive of students’ projects. 

Archive City is an artist team that exists to collect and re-materialize memory and post-memory within specific communities and places.  In 2008, Cindy Mochizuki, Lois Klassen and Jaimie Robson produced Archive City: Portraits of Lulu Island (Richmond Art Gallery), which existed as fieldwork and a memory collection lab involving local residents of Richmond, BC. In 2009, Archive City re-materialized memories surrounding the location of the Richmond Olympic Oval in Frozen Fictions (Roberts Street Social Centre, Halifax, NS). 

CCID 200 S090 & CCID 300 S090– Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Natalie Doonan 

Topic: Pivot Legal Society - Yes In My Backyard 

Yes In My Backyard (YIMBY) is a 3-credit elective course open to students in any ECU program.  In this course, students will collaborate with Pivot Legal Society in their YIMBY Campaign, which aims to gain public support for programs that make housing accessible to everyone. 

Students will learn how to apply their unique skills as practicing artists, in working with issues of housing and homelessness.  Students will be guided through a collaborative process, in which they will develop work in response to the specific needs of a partner organization, with the goal of addressing fears and prejudices about the people who live in supportive housing.  Students enrolled in this course are strongly encouraged to register also in CCID: The Ethics of Representation, which will inform project work by providing an ethical framework and appropriate methodologies for community practice. These two courses are complementary in addressing collaborative process and the dynamics of working within interdisciplinary team oriented projects. 

This course will provide students with methodological frameworks for socially engaged work.  Content will focus on artists who have addressed similar concerns in community projects, such as Rick Lowe, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Suzanne Lacy, Danielle Abrams, Laurie Jo Reynolds, Superflex, Jenny Holzer, Lucy Orta and Group Material.  Students will be required to participate online (through our Moodle course website), and will have regular meetings with representatives from Pivot Legal Society, who will help to guide projects.

CCID 200 F002C & CCID 300 F002C - Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Sarah Van Borek

Topic: David Suzuki Foundation - Rewilding Vancouver

This is a dynamic community mapping, storytelling & visioning project in partnership with Canada's leading environmental organization, the David Suzuki Foundation (DSF) and in affiliation with the Museum of Vancouver (MOV). Students will have exciting outdoor adventures and use technological innovation to create a “virtual urban safari” that will help reconnect Metro Vancouver residents with our city’s “wild side” (i.e. the historical natural environment) while inspiring various municipalities to follow the lead of some best practices. Students will build relationships with community experts and local wild places while learning how to direct, shoot and edit digital narratives that include site-specific multimedia (photographic, video, illustration and sound-based) documentation of healthy & productive natural environments. Examples may include the Surrey Library’s largest and most biologically diverse outdoor green wall in North America, the Purple Thistle Food Forest in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside and 12,000 year-old Camosun Bog.  While this “virtual urban safari” will be integrated into a larger Rewilding Vancouver exhibit launching at MOV in February 2014, the semester will culminate with a public screening of students’ work on “gray infrastructure” (i.e. walls of select buildings) as a catalyst for community dialogue around what Green Infrastructure is and why it’s so important for the well-being of all.  Students will develop professional relationships with James MacKinnon, MOV guest curator and author of The 100-Mile Diet, as well as project partners at the David Suzuki Foundation. Students in Film/Video, Animation and Photography are encouraged to apply for this course, although no prior video experience is required and students across all disciplines are welcome.

 CCID 200 S090 & CCID 300 S090 - Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Natalie Doonan

Topic: Food Not Bombs

Food Not Bombs is a 3-credit ONLINE elective course open to students in any ECU program.  In this course, students will collaborate with Food Not Bombs (http://www.foodnotbombs.net/) toward the end of war, poverty and environmental destruction. 

Students will learn how to apply their unique skills as practicing artists, in working with issues of social, and especially food justice.  Food Not Bombs has been recovering and sharing free vegan or vegetarian food with the public in over 1,000 cities internationally, since 1980.  This non-hierarchical, consensus-based, volunteer organization solicits help with a range of artistic tasks ranging from writing, illustration and design, to event organization, puppetry, performance and any strategies that can be used to raise awareness of their work.  Students will be guided through a collaborative process, in which they will develop work in response to the specific needs of this partner organization, with the goal of addressing the fact that food is a right rather than a privilege.  Students enrolled in this course are strongly encouraged to register also in CCID: The Ethics of Representation, which will inform project work by providing an ethical framework and appropriate methodologies for community practice. These two courses are complementary in addressing collaborative process and the dynamics of working within interdisciplinary team oriented projects. 

This course will provide students with methodological frameworks for socially engaged work.  Content will focus on artists who have addressed similar concerns in community projects, such as Danielle Abrams, Critical Art Ensemble and Amy Franceschini.  Students will be required to participate online (through our Moodle course website), and will have regular meetings with the course instructor, who will help to guide projects.   

CCID 200 SU01 + CCID 300 SU01 – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Hannah Jickling + Helen Reed

Topic: Arts Club Theatre - Do It Again

The theatre is the only place in the world where a gesture, once made, can never be made the same way twice --Antonin Artaud
In collaboration with the Arts Club Theatre Company, Do It Again investigates the performative in contemporary art, with a special focus on reperformance, restagings, and the ways in which cultural texts change over time. Through activities, assignments, readings & discussions we will explore the embodied gestures of performance work.
In class we will discuss art works such as Tehching Hsieh’s One Year Performances, The Battle of Orgreave by Jeremy Deller, Fluxus instruction works, Seven Easy Pieces by Marina Abramovic, In the Near Future by Sharon Hayes, and Where We Come From by Emily Jacir.
The class will culminate in a group-generated intervention in the Arts Club Theatre Company 50th Anniversary Arts Walk.  

CCID 200 F001A + CCID 300 F001A – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Sarah Van Borek

Topic: David Suzuki Foundation - EcoMUSICology

EcoMUSICology is a dynamic public education project in partnership with Canada's leading environmental organization, the David Suzuki Foundation. Students will have exciting outdoor adventures and collaborate with local musicians and a sound recording engineer to create original songs and music videos promoting a Regional Green Infrastructure Network across Metro Vancouver. Students will learn the basics of sound recording and editing and will record site-specific animal, earth and human-generated sounds as well as create unique, musical sounds using found materials in nature, to contribute to the song creation process. Students will also learn basics in camera, lighting, art direction and video editing while working collaboratively in teams to produce music videos that further develop key messages of songs. The project will provide students with an opportunity to participate in a radio show on Emily Carr’s radio station and possibly have their work featured in a museum exhibition (TBC). The course will culminate with a public screening and concert event as a catalyst for community dialogue. Students will develop professional relationships with project partners at the David Suzuki Foundation. Students in Film, Video, Photography and Animation are encouraged to apply but students from all disciplines are welcome. 

CCID 200 F002R + CCID 300 F002R – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Zoe Kreye

Topic: Unlearning

Unlearning is the tool for sustaining your creative process. With a balanced combination of theory and practice this is class equips students for life of creativity.

Theory: Many artists today are organizing education platforms and framing their artworks as learning processes. These frameworks propose education as an approachable, accessible model for community engagement, where publics can make meaningful contact. This so called “pedagogical turn” shows an increased development of initiatives looking for alternatives to established educational settings and questioning the politics of education in relation to society. With an individualist ethos still shaping our current western education system, there is newfound hope in evolving heterotopias and projects of self-organization, collaboration and open exchange. In order to reposition ourselves and adapt to these rapidly transforming realities we need to critically UNLEARN; produce alternative fields of thought and action. Course curriculum will introduce the heritage of questioning education; as in the 1920s with Rudolf Steiner, John Dewey, the Bauhaus, Joseph Beuys; combine with the impact of social movements such as class, race and gender activism. As well we will look at contemporary examples: Interflugs (Berlin), Learning Site (Berlin), Shikshantar (Udaipur), Anhoek School (New York), School of the Future (New York), Malmö Free University for Women (Malmö), Radical Education Research Collective (Toronto), Temporary Services (Copenhagen), Deschooling Society Serpentine Gallery (London).

Practice: Unlearning holds inherent a new way of critically reflecting change – while at the same time acknowledging the challenges (maybe in some cases even impossibility) of the task. It alludes to an active and ongoing experimental process, full of attempts and failure while trying to make a new path. It is a reversing – a backwards movement – in order to move forwards again in a new direction. Students will move through varied unlearning practices: performance, dance, movement, public intervention, physical theatre, meditation, intuition training, and expressive arts.

This curriculum will equip students to develop object based and performative artworks that stretch beyond their prescribed and perceived confines. Class time will be active, based in workshops, presentations, off-site experiments and discussions of weekly readings. Assignments will integrate studio and professional practices and be applicable for students across departments and levels.

CCID 200 S002C & CCID 300 S002C – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Sabine Silberberg

Topic: Art and Healing

This course is designed to offer students a rich introduction to core elements of the arts in selected arts-based therapies, conflict transformation and peacebuilding.

In a first phase, students will be investigating elements of the theoretical foundations to expand culturally embedded conceptualizations of health, illness, and healing – to prepare for the experiential main part of this unique learning opportunity.

Experienced practitioners from arts therapies and conflict transformation and peacebuilding fields will then be joining us in the classroom to share working knowledge through arts-based exercises as well as narratives of local and international applications.

How may sensitization to one’s aesthetic expression of human existence contribute to reinvigoration and reconnection? With an attitude of exploration and play, special attention will be paid to the relational frame of the work, and qualities of listening and presence, to self and community.

Is healing a creative process? Through experiential immersion and engagement, and by designing arts-based interventions to be discussed with practitioners during field trips and skype conversations with local community-based and international practitioners, this course will introduce students to a refined understanding of the depth of art as a resource for healing processes and transformation.

CCID 300 SU01A – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Hannah Jickling & Helen Reed

Topic: The Wanderer

The Wanderer is a Community Projects course in which students apply conceptual, visual and tactile skills to projects that engage the environment and inhabitants in and around Vancouver. Much of the class content will focus on excursions, exercises and assignments, augmented with readings and lectures. The Wanderer will explores cultural and artistic traditions of walking & wandering as strategies for respite & reflection, protest & demonstration, as well as research & rumination.

With recognition that there are diverse forms of art production – from objects, to ideas, to experiences – this course will explore both active and reflective work.  Methodologies such as slowness, aimlessness and chance encounters will be employed.  

CCID 300 S003 – Community Projects (3) credits

Instructor: Cameron Cartiere

Topic: Engaging Site: the Social Practice of Public Art and Community Design

Working in the public realm as a creative practitioner is rich with opportunity and fraught with contentious territory. What is the relationship between public art and socially engaged practice? Where does design come into the equation and what is the role of community art? Can these ways of working overlap and is an adaptable practice attainable or even desirable? 

This studio-based course is a unique opportunity to unpack the shared methodologies across the field of public practice within a site-based practicum. Working with a specific site in Richmond, students will have the opportunity to engage directly with city planners, developers, public art officers, parks department officials, the site biologist, the landscape designer, the city archivist and members of the city’s sustainability unit to develop in-depth knowledge of how communities are developed and the impact of change on environmental, social, economic, and cultural levels.

The students will work in teams to develop a substantial brief with recommendations for community engagement, design opportunities, and environmental considerations. The majority of studio work will take place on campus, with two fieldtrips to Richmond. The final brief will be presented in a public forum and will be used as essential source material for a public art competition. Students will be eligible to participate in the public art process following successful completion of the class.

This curriculum allows students to acquire direct experience working in the field and to participate across disciplines. Class sessions will be active; focused on workshops, presentations, site visits, and discussions of current practice. Assignments will integrate studio and professional praxes and be applicable for students across departments and levels.

  CCID 200 S002B & CCID 300 S002B – Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Zoe Kreye

Topic: MOSIAC - Immigration / Spaces of Belonging

In partnership with MOSIAC (a local non-profit settlement organization) students will work in dialogue with immigrants living in Vancouver to create relational art works and documentaries. This course will consider the diversity of the ECUAD international student community in relation to the continued increase of immigration to Vancouver. In our ever-changing intercultural society we can experience inspiring multiplicity as well as the challenges of dislocation for both citizens and new comers. This course provides a forum for the university and its students (Canadian and international) to explore issues of belonging, using art as a vehicle to unpack the complexity of Canadian “multiculturalism”.
Referencing students’ own experiences, local community relations and national politics, students will research and produce projects that investigate home, 'integration', social isolation, attachment and community building. Using a dialogue methodology students will gain skills in cross-cultural communication, dispute resolution/conflict mediation, anti-racism and dialogue facilitation skills. The goal of this course is for students to learn how art can be used to challenge the dynamics of difference, and foster agency for negotiating spaces of belonging.

CCID 200 F003P + CCID 300 F003P - Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Sarah Van Borek

Topic: David Suzuki Foundation - Concrete Jungle, Rewilding Vancouver

CONCRETE JUNGLE is a dynamic urban-rural creative exchange program in partnership with Canada’s leading environmental organization, the David Suzuki Foundation, the Gibsons-based community engaged arts non-profit “Deer Crossing The Art Farm” (DCTAF), and the Town of Gibsons (Sunshine coast, BC). Drawing on fields of experience design and behaviour change communication, students will build site-specific, multimedia installations that infiltrate the urban environment with projections of the wild while challenging the ways in which humans value nature both inside and outside the city. These installations will include creative elements resulting from an exchange with emerging youth artists involved in DCTAF’s The Woodlands Project. Students will do field work in a specific urban forest in Vancouver, take a day trip to The Art Farm and a rural forest near Gibsons, and explore their wider self-community-nature relationships through video and sound recording tools. The installations will include a storytelling component developed from interviews students conduct with “local experts” (biologists, park staff, tour guides, etc) in the communities of Gibsons and/or Vancouver. Students will build professional relationships with project partners by interacting directly with them in meetings and some classes. The program will culminate in a public exhibition of students’ work in both the Town of Gibsons and in Vancouver. 

CCID 200 F004Q + CCID 300 F004Q - Community Projects (3 credits)

Instructor: Justin Langlois

Topic: Between Consensus and Dissensus: Everyday Life as Social Practice 

This course will explore social engagement as a studio practice that either disrupts or merges with everyday life. Through a range of directed and independent studio and public projects, students will work to respond to questions including: Does socially engaged art have to do civic or public good? Can there be transdisciplinary approaches to contemporary art making that would contribute to fields of inquiry such as urban planning, education, or sustainability? As both political action and contemporary art imagine new worlds, how can art projects be seen as potential models for living? This course will work to develop a rigorous and useful dialogue between topics taken up in HUMN 304: Social Practice Seminar Social Practice Seminar and independent and collaborative artistic production.

CCID 202 F001N + CCID 302 F001N – Fieldwork: Topics (3 credits)

Instructor: Cameron Cartiere

Topic: Where is Marpole? 

This CCID practice-based course offers students an opportunity to engage in coursework focused on embedded practice that includes an off-site fieldwork experience. This class will be based in the Oak Park fieldhouse located in the Vancouver neighbourhood of Marpole. Students will create their own practice-based project proposals based on site research, cultural context, and independent studio work. This is an opportunity to develop practical experience working in the public realm and to explore new approaches for understanding audience, engagement, and negotiation. This course is open to students in any degree program.

 

 

Exhibitions by our Community Projects Students

WRAP: A Student/Community Project

Zara Haque | 4am

Emily Carr's Faculty of Culture + Community and the Downtown Business Improvement Association present a public art project on Granville Street. <read more>