Special Topics for Summer 2019 + Spring 2019

Special Topics 

Please note: this page will be updated as information is confirmed. In case of a discrepancy between this page and myEC, the information on myEC will be deemed correct.

  • Additional information on these courses is available at https://myec.ecuad.ca/
  • Most credit courses have prerequisites that are clearly outlined on the website.

Summer 2019

AHIS 325 SU01 – Studies in Modern Art (3)

Wednesdays + Fridays, 9:00 am – 11:50 am, Summer 2019

Instructor: Marisa C. Sánchez

Topic: BECKETT NOW

 The frequency with which Samuel Beckett’s writings—from Proust (1931) to Catastrophe (1982), have dispersed throughout post-war contemporary art, by artists working in film, video, large-scale installations and socially-engaged work, is the starting point for this seminar. This course is guided by three questions: In what ways have Beckett’s texts emerged and dispersed within contemporary art? What is the theoretical significance of the appearance of Beckett’s texts within contemporary art practices? And, what do Beckett’s texts afford visual artists? Through readings and discussions on artists including Bruce Nauman, Stan Douglas, Judith Barry, Atom Egoyan, Paul Chan, and Tania Bruguera, among others, we will explore what these artists learned from reading Beckett and how his writings are a catalyst through which to explore such topics as: subjectivity, technological obsolescence, and power. The syllabus will include writings by Beckett alongside art historical and theoretical texts.

CCID 202 SU02B + CCID 302 SU02B – Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm, Summer 2019

Instructor: Amanda Huynh

Topic: Reciprocity / Recipe / City

In this course students will look at the ways we can define resiliency, keep our neighbourhood nourished, and what it means to create a community of care. With the resources at 312 Main, a community co-op in the Downtown Eastside (DTES), close to historic Chinatown and Hogan’s Alley, students will have the opportunity to contribute to generative city-building. Exploration will be done through the lens of food and foraging as a way of acknowledging land, place, and knowledge. Through a practice-based approach, students will be able to ground their expertise not only within the community but within the physical space at 312 Main, and its history. We will build upon research ethics towards informed community consent and empowering voices in the DTES community not as subjects, but as experts. Classes will be an intercultural, intergenerational mix of events, exchange, feasting, lectures, and making, with time for students to develop and reflect on their work enlivening on-site archives, and bridging stories and conversation in preparing for the unknowable futures on unceded Coast Salish territories.

CCID 202 SU01A + CCID 302 SU01A – Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Course times and days vary, listed on course outline, Summer 2019

Instructor: Elvira Hufschmid

Topic: Aesthetic Transformations and Urban Farming

The City of Vancouver initiated a bold action plan called Greenest City, a strategy for staying on the leading edge of urban sustainability by 2020. As part of this plan, the city has been supporting citizen's initiatives of growing healthy food in urban areas, and thereby allowing for the emergence of over 110 community gardens. In this course, we will take Vancouver's urban organic agriculture movement as a starting point for our artistic explorations. Our field trips will lead us to several community gardens, field houses, and an urban farm where we will have the opportunity to engage with local farmers and activists. We will let ourselves be inspired by plant communication, the botany of desire, animal complicity, the beauty of decay, invasive species, or ‘seeds as commons’, and we will research the social, political and historical significance of local food production, as well as our relationship to the land. In this context, what does it mean to be on the unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples? This course focuses on transdisciplinarity and encourages students to investigate different mediums and strategies, and how those can be made productive to express an idea. Students will be introduced to ‘Aesthetic Transformation’ as an idea-generating approach in art making that engages them to develop a body of independent work based on their individual interests. Practice-based exercises, such as drawing from observation, performative explorations, video recording and sound editing, material examination, conceptual inquiry, as well as collaboration and critical reflection, will serve to fuel the creative process. This class requires students to participate in various field trips around the city, rain or shine.

CCID 202 SU03C + CCID 302 SU03C, Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Course times and days vary, listed on course outline, Summer 2019

Instructor:
Sarah van Borek

Topic: Making Waveforms, an outdoor education meets art activism program championing global water security.

Come play outside while making a global impact! Offered in association with Canada's leading environmental organization, the David Suzuki Foundation (DSF), and in collaboration with the Native Education College (NEC), the Beaty Biodiversity Museum, and the Future Water Institute (FWI) in South Africa. This course is part of the instructor’s PhD research on reconciliation through [site-specific, media arts based] environmental education on the water-climate change nexus in Canada and South Africa. Students are invited to be co-investigators in this study aimed at creating a model of curriculum that can be applied internationally. Students who register for this course are NOT required to participate in the research. No prior video experience is required.

 

DESN 350 SU01 – Topics Interdiscipline Design (3)

Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:00pm-3:50pm 

Instructor: Zach Camozzi

Topic: Design for equity: access to nature

This is a field school course that prioritizes context mapping at local sites in Vancouver and will pull content from social innovation, design and nature and Oxfords ‘map the system’ challenge: http://www.oxfordglobalchallenge.com/
 
Within interdisciplinary teams, students will question access to nature as a sign of privilege, dig deeply into the benefits of time spent outdoors and consider new alternatives to connect to nature in local and deeply urban contexts. Access to nature includes conversations around food security, green space, development, architecture, and transportation, and engages vulnerable populations in the Vancouver area. Outcomes will include visual representations of complex systems, presentations, and the creation of generative tools, all of which intend to expose disseminate issues in a way that people can understand, share and learn from. Students are expected to work across the disciplines of graphic, industrial, and interaction design.
 
This class will allow students to map their neighbourhoods more fully, from perspectives they might not be able to imagine now. New opportunities will present themselves as students apply critical theory and research precedents and identify gaps within systems. Insights gleaned will benefit students interested in systems and looking for local and community engaged approaches to their 3rd and 4th year core studios.

 

HUMN 305 SU01 – Studies in the Humanities (3)

Tuesdays + Thursdays, 4:00 pm – 6:50 pm, Summer 2019

Instructor: Jacqueline Witkowski

Topic: Tactics of disruption: performance, writing, and protest in South America, 1960-1980
This course will address visual art production and writing by a select group of artists in South America from 1960-1980. Beginning with how artists established shifts from a Euro-American modernism and the definition of conceptualism under a Latin American rubric, the course will focus on the art forms that evolved from concrete poetry and art to become approaches that were centred on writing and performance as vehicles of protest against violent governments. Texts by artists will be used to supplement the theoretical and historical readings, with each week focusing on art practices connected to poetry, asemic writing, and hermetic literature, all which are example of the generated writing alongside visual art forms during this period. Throughout the course, special emphasis will be placed on the development of visual literacy, specifically by building the conceptual and communicative tools necessary for critically looking, thinking, and writing about art; it seeks to break down the perception of a barrier between writing on the one hand and art-making on the other.

 

HUMN 305 SU90 – Studies in the Humanities (3)

Online Course, Summer 2019

Instructor: Magnolia Pauker

Topic: Counterpublic Dialogue(s): Inter Views in Politics, Philosophy, and the Contemporary
This course will investigate the emerging field of Performance Philosophy with a focus on the interview as a distinct form of social practice therein. Approaching philosophy as itself a mode of performance, we will investigate its diverse forms by reading and viewing interviews, lectures, essays, and book excerpts. Our focus will be on the interview as a social practice, a mode of public engagement, where theory and practice intersect and through which the philosophical venue opens into the public. Readings will be drawn from the work of Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Judith Butler, and Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak among others. Screenings will include: Agarrando Pueblo (1978), Examined Life (2008), Edward Said, The Last Interview (2004), excerpts from Gilles Deleuze from A to Z (1996), The Gleaners and I (2000), and Derrida (2002), along with archival footage of televised interviews. Students will have the opportunity to research, conduct, and publish an interview or thought paper for their term projects. The course will be conducted entirely online and students will not be required to attend campus.

 

HUMN 306 SU01 – Studies in the Humanities (3)

Tuesdays + Thursdays, 9:00 am – 11:50 am, Summer 2019

Instructor: Jeffrey Swartz

Topic: From Design Criticism to Critical Design
This course engages criticism in contemporary design from complementary perspectives: while design criticism is about design, critical design is done through design. Using historical and theoretical references from all design fields, the course encourages students to both write design criticism and produce critical and activist design, conceiving design projects in function of critical intent. The idea of criticism of design follows traditional modes, usually taking the form of spoken discourse or published text, including in audio-visual format or on social media. Yet it is also an idea in crisis, as many specialists hold. Is design criticism necessary for design practice to advance? Are design professionals versed in its functions and mechanisms? What do we need to know to think, speak and write critically about design? Here the importance of understanding historical cases of design debates and recent theoretical currents in design is emphasised. Students are invited to analyse design criticism while writing critical texts. Criticism through design, identified by British duo Dunne & Raby as critical or speculative design, responds to the idea that design knowledge is acquired and advanced in practice, within the project. Whether addressing the demands of users or clients, or working independently as a self-initiated practice, it wraps itself in further layers of meaning and involves communicational skill. It is often particularly appropriate for display and exhibition; rhetorical components feature prominently; it is often humorous or ironic. Since it addresses other designers and can be provocative or symbolic, it is a form of meta-design: critical design is loaded. Historical examples, such as 1960s Italian radical design and currents in social design (emphasising community participation, service, paradigmatic transition and sustainability, amongst others), help illuminate and contextualise the idea. Contemporary examples of critical design (Jurgen Bey, Martí Guixé, Natalie Jeremijenko, Sputniko!) as well as academic research on the movement’s political and cultural biases are provided. Finally, reflection on design criticism and critical design leads us to consider research on design’s relationship to social and political causes, where designers emerge as activists, working individually or collectively. This historical, theoretical and practical course is meant for students of all design disciplines. It also has crossover interest for students of art and media.

 

HUMN 306 SU02 – Studies in the Humanities (3)

Tuesdays – Fridays 10:00 am – 4:00 pm, Summer 2019

Instructor: Rita Wong

Topic: Sacrifice Zone or Sacred Zone? Staying with the Troubles & the Treasures of the Peace River Valley
Much of British Columbia’s wealth is built on the sacrifices of Indigenous peoples and their lands. For example, the WAC Bennett and Peace Canyon dams built on the Peace River, which provide approximately a third of BC’s electricity, flooded an enormous land mass, displacing and traumatizing Indigenous peoples and residents of areas that are now underwater. Today, the Site C dam threatens to become a similar sacrifice zone on Treaty 8 territory in northeast BC, flooding an area the length of the distance from Vancouver to Chilliwack. Caleb Behn suggests that reconciliation with Indigenous peoples leads to reconciliation with the land. This course explores what such reconciliation would look like through the example of the Site C dam, which is currently proceeding despite a legal battle by the West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations who have sought an injunction to stop the dam. BC Hydro apologized for the painful impact of the WAC Bennett dam in 2016, yet it continues to clear cut and plow over forests, planning to flood sacred land for the controversial Site C dam. In 2019, the United Nation’s Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination called on Canada to suspend the dam in light of how it violates Aboriginal rights that should be protected under Treaty 8.

 

INDD 350 SU01 – Topics in Industrial Design (3)

Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:00am-11:50am 

Instructor: Aaron Oussoren

Topic: Glass Casting

This course explores emergent methods of glass production as they relate to the contemporary object and sculpture. Projects will explore and incorporate digital fabrication methods in relation to traditional glassforming processes. Students will gain a general understanding of glass forming techniques, 3D printing processes, and CAD modelling. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the limitations and opportunities of implementing glass workflows within their practice. Projects will be self- directed within the pragmatic constraints of the class. Participation in group activities such as demonstrations, critiques and lectures is expected.

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SOCS 300 SU01 – Studies in the Social Sciences (3)

Mondays + Wednesdays, 4:00 pm – 6:50 pm, Summer 2019

Instructor: Phil Smith

Topic: (Not So) Hidden Persuaders: “Hits”, Influencers, and the Mechanics of Persuasion
From the first days of media culture in the 1920s to the rise of what Adam Alter has termed “Irresistible Technologies”, the persuasive powers inherent in cultural production have been increasingly studied, codified, and accelerated. Accordingly, this course will examine the social, psychological, and cultural mechanisms of persuasion through a series of historical and contemporary case studies from art, design, and media (including examples from popular culture) in an attempt to further understand that which might initially reach an audience’s mind, heart, and/or brain (the distinctions among the three to be further discussed over the term) as well as the means by which, in show business parlance, to “keep ‘em coming back for more”. Through readings, discussions, and selected short screenings, the course will ultimately seek to address one of the defining questions currently facing creatives in all fields: if the means of cultural production are becoming more accessible, automated, and widespread, how then to best have one’s work still achieve recognition, that is, to cite a best-selling 1950s book on the subject (its title eerily prescient of the social media age), “How to Win Friends and Influence People” via one’s creative output.

 

Spring 2019

AHIS 325 S001 – Studies in Modern Art (3)

Thursdays, 8:30 am – 11:20 am Spring 2019

Instructor: Art Perry

Topic: WORDS & IMAGES: The Alchemy of Language into Visual Art

Language has been the subtext behind much of twentieth and twenty-first century artistic practice. Whether it is critical writings, artist manifestos, appropriated theories from cultural, political or academic sources, words have shaped much of modern culture’s more avant-garde visual art. Keeping this in mind Words & Images will look at the transformative power of literature, poetry and drama on the visual arts. This course will study different variants of expression within the visual arts (painting, photography, video and film) that have been influenced by or adapted from literary sources. The transfer from page to screen will be a theme running throughout this course. Films and video art have been a prime way to visualize many of the complexities within contemporary literature, poetry and drama, and thereby providing entry into the often unapproachable tangle of modernist and postmodern writings. Words & Images will also study contemporary artists whose work refers to writings that are more personal or specific to their own directives: for example Bill Viola’s use of writings by St Francis of Assisi and St John of the Cross, Laurie Anderson’s incorporation of William Burroughs ‘cut-ups’ or Stan Douglas’s debt to Samuel Beckett.

AHIS 325 S002 – Studies in Modern Art (3)

Thursdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Art Perry

Topic: WORDS & IMAGES: The Alchemy of Language into Visual Art

Language has been the subtext behind much of twentieth and twenty-first century artistic practice. Whether it is critical writings, artist manifestos, appropriated theories from cultural, political or academic sources, words have shaped much of modern culture’s more avant-garde visual art. Keeping this in mind Words & Images will look at the transformative power of literature, poetry and drama on the visual arts. This course will study different variants of expression within the visual arts (painting, photography, video and film) that have been influenced by or adapted from literary sources. The transfer from page to screen will be a theme running throughout this course. Films and video art have been a prime way to visualize many of the complexities within contemporary literature, poetry and drama, and thereby providing entry into the often unapproachable tangle of modernist and postmodern writings. Words & Images will also study contemporary artists whose work refers to writings that are more personal or specific to their own directives: for example Bill Viola’s use of writings by St Francis of Assisi and St John of the Cross, Laurie Anderson’s incorporation of William Burroughs ‘cut-ups’ or Stan Douglas’s debt to Samuel Beckett.

AHIS 333 S001 – Interdisciplinary Forums (3)

Wednesdays, 4:30 pm – 7:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Rob Stone

Topic: Curating as a Social Practice

This course will approach the practice of curating as an innovative and experimental way of producing new knowledge and understanding, new concepts and collaborations. It is a practical and theoretical course which will have several curatorial and other, annotative outcomes and which will challenge your thinking in a way that will allow you to reflect on what could be meant by a curatorial act in an expanded sense.

Our thinking will be prompted by the idea of ‘The Community of the Question’. and we will examine the recent origins of that. We will look at traditional and contemporary motivations in curating and their relationships to education, concepts of history and stewardship, political activity, the authorship of cultural investigation and the aesthetic government of discrete media, mixed media. Alongside more recognizable modes of curating, we will also look at other kinds of curatorial insight that might, when one pays proper attention to the strangeness of the ordinary, be found in a gait, a voice, a memory, a piece of film.

This course takes place during the preparations for Emily Carr’s Degree Show, and we will consider that occasion as a practical way of imagining the complex and hybridized types of fugitive critical space that curating can suggest.

AHIS 333 S002 – Interdisciplinary Forums (3)

Wednesdays, 4:30 pm – 7:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Rob Stone

Topic: Curating as a Social Practice

This course will approach the practice of curating as an innovative and experimental way of producing new knowledge and understanding, new concepts and collaborations. It is a practical and theoretical course which will have several curatorial and other, annotative outcomes and which will challenge your thinking in a way that will allow you to reflect on what could be meant by a curatorial act in an expanded sense.

Our thinking will be prompted by the idea of ‘The Community of the Question’. and we will examine the recent origins of that. We will look at traditional and contemporary motivations in curating and their relationships to education, concepts of history and stewardship, political activity, the authorship of cultural investigation and the aesthetic government of discrete media, mixed media. Alongside more recognizable modes of curating, we will also look at other kinds of curatorial insight that might, when one pays proper attention to the strangeness of the ordinary, be found in a gait, a voice, a memory, a piece of film.

This course takes place during the preparations for Emily Carr’s Degree Show, and we will consider that occasion as a practical way of imagining the complex and hybridized types of fugitive critical space that curating can suggest.

AHIS 336 S001 – Hist + Contemporary Movement (3)

Tuesdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Patrik Andersson

Topic: Nouveau Réalisme

This course focuses on one of the most prominent artistic movements to emerge in post-war Europe. Through both conceptual and material approaches, artists associated with Nouveau Réalisme responded in a variety of novel and critical ways to the shifting nature of what Guy Debord called The Society of the Spectacle. Artists, such as Niki de Saint-Phalle, Yves Klein and Daniel Spoerri, will be considered in relation to writers and film makers associated with (amongst other things) the Nouveau Roman and French New Wave Cinema (Godard, Perec, Tati and Varda). While focusing on art, culture and politics of the fifties and sixties, the students in this class will be asked to research and write about contemporary artists who drawing on this history and artistic strategies fashion their own critical projects that address the modernities we face today.

AHIS 401 S001 – Topics in Curatorial Projects (3)

Mondays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Cameron Cartiere

Topic: The Practice of Curating

When it comes to books, social media, meal, clothes, or houses, we no longer seem to edit, select, plan or design. The term of choice is now “to curate.” But in an era where it seems that anything and everything can be curated, what does it mean to be a practicing curator? This seminar looks at the pragmatic and expressive approaches within the ever-expanding curatorial field. Students will have an opportunity to develop conceptual proposals into practical plans for exhibitions, installations, or public projects. The seminar will be divided into three parts: Planning group and thematic exhibitions / The solo exhibition and understanding the monograph / Curating outside the white cube

AHIS 404 S001 – Art Now: Topics in Contemporary (3)

Thursdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Patrik Andersson

Topic: Seven Easy Pieces: The Monochrome in Contemporary Art

This particular instalment of AHIS 404 takes issue with the fact that a majority of contemporary art returns us to tropes from the history of Modernist art. This course aims to raise questions about these repetitions and considers relationships such as performance and documentation; the original and copy; as well as the role of the artist and spectator. In particular, the course is aimed at setting in motion for the students a critical dialogue between historical practices and contemporary art and ideas. This term we will focus our attention on the tradition of the monochrome and look closely at seven specific historical works that continues to inspire, provoke and/or challenge the paradigm we call Contemporary Art.

AHIS 404 S002 – Art Now: Topics in Contemporary (3)

Fridays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Patrik Andersson

Topic: Seven Easy Pieces: The Monochrome in Contemporary Art

This particular instalment of AHIS 404 takes issue with the fact that a majority of contemporary art returns us to tropes from the history of Modernist art. This course aims to raise questions about these repetitions and considers relationships such as performance and documentation; the original and copy; as well as the role of the artist and spectator. In particular, the course is aimed at setting in motion for the students a critical dialogue between historical practices and contemporary art and ideas. This term we will focus our attention on the tradition of the monochrome and look closely at seven specific historical works that continues to inspire, provoke and/or challenge the paradigm we call Contemporary Art.

AHIS 420 S001 – Topics in Feminism, Gender + Cultural Studies (3)

Thursdays, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Randy Cutler

Topic: Performance

This course is designed as an exploration of performance in contemporary theory, art and popular culture in the context of feminist, gender, and critical race theory. Our interdisciplinary syllabus is made up of writings drawn from art history, critical theory, and popular culture. We will focus on developing our skills to critically analyze networks of representation and power traversing local and global contexts. Students will learn about critical criteria, content analysis, and representations of gender, race, and sexuality. Close attention will be paid to the structure of each text in relation to the multiple and intersecting identities of readers and writers in the contemporary world. The class will also support an iterative writing process for the final assignment which is a Thought Paper.

AHIS 430 S001 – Topics in Contemporary Aboriginal Art (3)

Wednesdays, 4:30 pm – 7:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Richard Hill

Topic: Reading Contemporary Indigenous Artists in Depth: Beam, Belmore, Heap of Birds, Quick-To-See Smith

In this seminar we will explore the work of four Indigenous artists in depth through the process of reading about and discussing their work. The artists are: Carl Beam, Rebecca Belmore, Edgar Heap of Birds, and Jaune Quick-To-See Smith. Students will be required to keep up with weekly readings and be prepared to discuss them in class. The main assignment is a research essay on the work of a contemporary Indigenous artist.

ANIM 325 S002 – Special Topics in Animation (3)

Mondays, 3:50 pm - 6:40 pm Spring 2019 

Instructor: TBA

Topic: Look Development for 3D Computer Animation

Through 3D computer animation production, students will explore how to create a final look for 3D computer animation scenes in order to tell stories and express intentions clearly to the viewer. In this course, students will learn how to use various computer graphic methods to meet their creative needs, as well as experience the technical and artistic implementation of 3D modelling, texturing, digital lighting, and shading in 3D computer animation / digital media projects.

ANIM 325 S003 – Special Topics in Animation (3)

Saturdays, 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm Spring 2019 

Instructor: TBA

Topic: Look Development for 3D Computer Animation

Through 3D computer animation production, students will explore how to create a final look for 3D computer animation scenes in order to tell stories and express intentions clearly to the viewer. In this course, students will learn how to use various computer graphic methods to meet their creative needs, as well as experience the technical and artistic implementation of 3D modelling, texturing, digital lighting, and shading in 3D computer animation / digital media projects.

HUMN 205 S001 – Perspectives in the Crit. (3)

Mondays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm Spring 2019
Note: This class is linked. Students must take HUMN 205 S001 (3) together with CCID 202 S001 (3).

Instructor: Sanem Guvenc-Salgirli + Sadira Rodrigues

Topic: Critical Research Methods and Practice: Nature / Culture

Welcome to Critical Research Methods and Practice, the course that merges thinking with making, and contemplation with being in action.  It is seeks to create a new way for critical studies to be thought and practiced.  Guided by decolonizing pedagogical principles, it is an experiment in making collectivities through knowledge practices.  Inspired by the nature/culture trope, it is a search for a new methodology combining critical theory and contemporary creative practices in their most expansive forms.  Driven by methodological approaches that interrogate a range of cultural, geographic, and historical perspectives, it is a research-led and problem oriented teaching with fieldwork and site-driven projects.  Overall, this course is an invitation for students to collectively create a solid basis for critical thinking and cultural inquiry that is relevant to the contemporary world.

CCID 202 S002L – Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Thursdays, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Zoe Kreye

Topic: The Embodied Studio - Social Practice Open Studio

Consider contemporary art making and thought through the lens of the body, as a site for poetic or political transformation and expression. We will take a keen interest in public space, embodiment, somatics, site-specificity, experimental research inquiries, and unlearning. In this class, students will have the opportunity to realize self-directed projects with the support of faculty and peers. Classes will be a mix of guided workshops and time for students to develop and share their work in progress.

This CCID course counts towards the SPACE minor but is open and relevant to all majors: film/video, media, design, studio arts, illustration, photography, critical studies. Social Practice and Community Engagement (SPACE) focuses on nuance, experimentation and making things happen. It looks within and beyond the tradition of art as an object and proposes human relations as the material for art making. You will gain interdisciplinary skills towards your chosen major: idea development, embodied design, creative research, community cooperation, ethics, collaboration skills, conflict mediation and short/long-term project planning. Social Practice requires activated development: testing, practicing, shaking, re-envisioning, so come prepared to create.

CCID 300 S001 – Community Projects (3)

Note: This class is combined and linked. Students must take CCID 300 S001 (3) together with either SCLP 206 S001U (3) or SCLP 306 S001U (3) and HUMN 311 S003 (3).

Tuesdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Henry Tsang

Topic: Public Art Competition for the 43rd Annual Powell Street Festival

Public Art Competition for the 43rd Annual Powell Street Festival

Working in teams, students will undergo research and development of a proposal for an interactive public artwork for the upcoming Powell Street Festival, August 3-4, 2019. They will deliver their proposal as a live pitch to a selection committee comprised of arts, design and community organization professionals. The winning submission will be awarded a cash prize, with the potential to receive mentorship with Revery Architecture (formerly Bing Thom Architects) and Abaton Projects to further develop, fabricate and install/activate their project.

Research into the history and social geography of the Powell Street Festival, Oppenheimer Park, and the neighbourhood including Nihonmachi, Chinatown and the Downtown Eastside will be complemented with field trips and site analyses, readings and written responses on public art, public space, the public sphere, site-specificity, engagement strategies, community art and activism. Ideally, an understanding of the complex layers of various communities in the neighbourhood will contribute towards a more informed and hopefully nuanced approach to creating a proposal specific for this context. An iterative approach will be embraced where students will provide peer support as they workshop their concepts with each other on their journey towards creating an experiential artwork that engages the audience of the festival.

CCID 302 S001L – Fieldwork: Topics (3)

Thursdays, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Zoe Kreye

Topic: The Embodied Studio - Social Practice open studio

Consider contemporary art making and thought through the lens of the body, as a site for poetic or political transformation and expression. We will take a keen interest in public space, embodiment, somatics, site-specificity, experimental research inquiries, and unlearning. In this class, students will have the opportunity to realize self-directed projects with the support of faculty and peers. Classes will be a mix of guided workshops and time for students to develop and share their work in progress.

This CCID course counts towards the SPACE minor but is open and relevant to all majors: film/video, media, design, studio arts, illustration, photography, critical studies. Social Practice and Community Engagement (SPACE) focuses on nuance, experimentation and making things happen. It looks within and beyond the tradition of art as an object and proposes human relations as the material for art making. You will gain interdisciplinary skills towards your chosen major: idea development, embodied design, creative research, community cooperation, ethics, collaboration skills, conflict mediation and short/long-term project planning. Social Practice requires activated development: testing, practicing, shaking, re-envisioning, so come prepared to create.

CRAM 203 S001 Ceramics: Handbuilding (6)

CRAM 304 S002C Ceramics: Special Topics (3)

Wednesdays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2019 

Instructor: Babak Golkar

Topics: Handbuilding 

Investigates the hand-building process to create forms from both a conceptual and technical basis. Students develop an understanding and control of hand-building, learn to fire electric and gas kilns, and become familiar with glazing and surfacing materials. In addition, students acquire practical, critical, and historical tools to consider ceramics within contemporary culture and current art practices. Demonstrations, discussions, and presentations are regularly scheduled. Assigned and self-directed projects are developed and discussed in critiques.

CRAM 218 S001K Ceramics: Atmospheric Effects (3)

CRAM 304 S001K Ceramics: Special Topics

Mondays, 8:30am – 11:20am, Spring 2019 

Instructor: D’Arcy Margesson

Topics: Atmospheric Effects

This course explores the formal and aesthetic possibilities of diverse types of kiln firings (sawdust and reduction) and firing practices, where various atmospheres in the kiln affect the final surface qualities of the work.

CRAM 303 S001H Ceramics Practices: Topic (6)

INDD 330 S001H Ceramics: Advanced (6)

Wednesdays, 8:30am – 3:50pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: TBA

Topic: TBA

HUMN 205 S001 – Perspectives in the Crit. (3)

Mondays, 1:00 pm – 3:50 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Sanem Guvenc-Salgirli + Sadira Rodrigues

Topic: Critical Research Methods and Practice: Nature / Culture

Welcome to Critical Research Methods and Practice, the course that merges thinking with making, and contemplation with being in action.  It is seeks to create a new way for critical studies to be thought and practiced.  Guided by decolonizing pedagogical principles, it is an experiment in making collectivities through knowledge practices.  Inspired by the nature/culture trope, it is a search for a new methodology combining critical theory and contemporary creative practices in their most expansive forms.  Driven by methodological approaches that interrogate a range of cultural, geographic, and historical perspectives, it is a research-led and problem oriented teaching with fieldwork and site-driven projects.  Overall, this course is an invitation for students to collectively create a solid basis for critical thinking and cultural inquiry that is relevant to the contemporary world.

HUMN 305 S001 – Studies in the Humanities (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30 am – 11:20 am Spring 2019

Instructor: Phil Smith

Topic: Altered States: Gothic, Punk, Trance and Beyond 

The Guardian’s recent proclamation of 2017 as “Tech's terrible year” was perhaps the capstone to a growing recent recognition of the detrimental effects of technology on the human condition (although the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein this year served as a reminder this is also a discussion with long roots).

Accordingly, this course will examine ways in which artists and writers have sought to safeguard their humanity (and perhaps inextricably their artistic essence as well) in the midst of the scientific and technological storms surrounding them. This process has included movements into sub-cultures, mysticism, masks, and the unconscious, some of the methods by which to attain, to use the French poet Rimbaud’s phrase, “a systematic disorganization of the senses” in the face of an increasingly rationalist world.

A number of these kinds of movements will be examined in their historical context (through readings, audio/ visual material, and discussions) before turning our gaze to present day technological dilemmas in an attempt to evolve some additional strategies for reacting and responding to them.  Ultimately the course will seek to explore the question of how, within the new routine of the machine, we might seek to further maintain our humanities (in the plural here, given the increasingly diverse definitions thereof).

HUMN 306 S001 – Studies in the Humanities: Design (3)

Tuesdays, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Maxe Fisher

Topic: LIVE THEORY

Design is a mediator between us and what is produced, how we want to live, what is valued, and what gives all of life quality. The aims of this course are to explore emerging expressions of contemporary culture within a curious modernist framework through diverse forms of enquiry. The course will build upon learned skills and knowledge where speculative thought, the creative act and systematic research are applied to consider how any fragment of reality can be the initial source of design inspiration and research.

HUMN 306 is an opportunity to explore and investigate any manner of acts, actions, gestures, and performance in the meaningful and complex ways in which stuff participates across time, contexts and cultures. Building upon theory and practice, experiments or investigations in design practice, this course will explore the creative boundaries between the conceptual, the theoretical and the applied. Supporting novelty and original thinking, Live Theory develops a discourse between the act of designing, critical design thinking and a design process. Students will express their findings from observation and experimentation through a range of media, complexity and resolution, combined with relevant readings.

HUMN 306 S030 – Studies in the Humanities: Design (3)

Online, Spring 2019

Important: This is an accelerated, hybrid delivery course and will be delivered partially ONLINE combined with one week of in-class attendance (required) from Tuesday, February 19 to Saturday, February 23 in Room B3255 (9:00am to 4:00pm).

Instructor: Craig Badke and Gillian Russell

Topic: Design Intensive - Design as a Critical Medium

This 5 day intensive workshop serves as a research and design laboratory for students from across Emily Carr to work on a single theme. The workshop explores design as a medium through which we can instigate critical discussion and debate while encouraging more active forms of intervention and agency.

Students explore strategies and practices of critical design turning cultural observation and analysis into design projects with instantiated outcomes. By revealing and disrupting the invisible set narratives, beliefs and ideologies within contemporary culture, students learn to assess and identify social patterns and changes and to communicate those patterns using imaginative design methods.

HUMN 311 S090 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

This course is LINKED and students enrolling in this course must enroll in either DRWG 315 S001R or ILUS 305 S001R.

Online Spring 2019

Instructor: Daphne Plessner

Topic: The Body

What is ‘a body’? This course will explore the differing conceptions and manifestations of a ‘body’, not only human, animal and importantly, non-human beings, but also, to interrogate other expressions of ‘body’ such as ‘something that ‘embodies or gives concrete reality to a thing’ or as ‘a sensible object in physical space’ or as the ‘denseness, fullness, or firmness of texture’ or the ‘fullness and richness of flavor’ etc.  Students will be asked to engage in online discussion forums, group chats and crits in response to presentations, set readings, films etc., in addition to producing written work and a report on how the concept and aesthetics of ‘the body’ informs their own art practice.

HUMN 311 S002 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30 am –11:20 am Spring 2019

Instructor: Art Perry

Topic: The Beat Aesthetic: Poetics & Politics in Post-War American Culture/Counterculture

This HUMN 311 course deals with the art ... painting, poetry, novels, films, music ... as well as the social politics and hipness generated by outsiders, by being “cool”, by being “Beat”. The term Beat or Beat Generation comes from street talk of the late 1940s. It meant beaten. “The world against me” said Herbert Hunke, who introduced the term to William S. Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac. The Beat Aesthetic studies the growth of Beat counterculture in America that gave rise to jazz musicians like Charlie “Bird” Parker and writers such as Diane De Prima, Leroy Jones (Amira Baraka), Kerouac and Ginsberg. Other artists covered in the course include John Cassavetes, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Laurie Anderson, The Fugs, Anais Nin, Bob Dylan, Lou Reed, Leonard Cohen, Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, The New York Dolls, Jean-Michel Basquait and Tom Waits. Dig it.

HUMN 311 S003 – Visual Art Seminar (3)
Note: This class is linked. Students must take HUMN 311 S003 (3) together with CCID 300 S001 (3).

Tuesdays, 8:30 am –11:20 am Spring 2019

Instructor: Henry Tsang

Topic: Public Art Competition for the 43rd Annual Powell Street Festival

Public Art Competition for the 43rd Annual Powell Street Festival

Working in teams, students will undergo research and development of a proposal for an interactive public artwork for the upcoming Powell Street Festival, August 3-4, 2019. They will deliver their proposal as a live pitch to a selection committee comprised of arts, design and community organization professionals. The winning submission will be awarded a cash prize, with the potential to receive mentorship with Revery Architecture (formerly Bing Thom Architects) and Abaton Projects to further develop, fabricate and install/activate their project.

Research into the history and social geography of the Powell Street Festival, Oppenheimer Park, and the neighbourhood including Nihonmachi, Chinatown and the Downtown Eastside will be complemented with field trips and site analyses, readings and written responses on public art, public space, the public sphere, site-specificity, engagement strategies, community art and activism. Ideally, an understanding of the complex layers of various communities in the neighbourhood will contribute towards a more informed and hopefully nuanced approach to creating a proposal specific for this context. An iterative approach will be embraced where students will provide peer support as they workshop their concepts with each other on their journey towards creating an experiential artwork that engages the audience of the festival.

Description TBA

HUMN 311 S004 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Thursdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Alex Phillips

Topic: The Artist as Ethnographer

This course examines “the ethnographic turn” in contemporary art and its implications for the practicing artist. The phrase “ethnographic turn” refers to a movement in contemporary art whereby artists have adopted the methodologies of ethnographic collecting and display as part of their work. The artistic use of social scientific methods parallels the recognition within postmodern anthropology that its documents too are cultural products. The course will survey such issues as the preservation and display of cultural artifacts, the role of the archive, the critique of social scientific authority, the history of exhibit design, problems in representation, and the tension between public and private funding of museums and galleries. Artists whose work will be reviewed include Fred Wilson, Louise Lawler, Mark Dion, Andrea Fraser, Lothar Baumgarten, Iris Haussler, and Liz Magor, among others. The course includes readings in art history and anthropology, field trips to several museums, and a sustained studio project.

HUMN 311 S005 – Visual Art Seminar (3)

Thursdays, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Cameron Cartiere

Topic: Visual Art Seminar: Collaborating with Nature

This HUMN 311 seminar is an intensive bridge for developing long-term engagement with eco-art and social practice. It is a dynamic opportunity to put ideas into action. Students will unpack a wide range of methodologies within the field, undertake their own research, and produce research proposals to be presented at an end of term symposium. Students from ALL disciplines interested in expanding their environmental vocabulary and practices are welcome.

This seminar will focus on theories and practices of environmental art, which can include community arts and eco-activism as well as other environmental art practices in the public realm or within a gallery/museum context. The course will focus on the social challenges and responsibility of artists and the relevance of environmental art to society. Together we will discuss trends in a variety of art practices (writing, visual art, film, performance) that reframe art as a method for community groups and activists to explore and engage with contemporary societal issues regarding the environment, as well as a method for artists to contribute original approaches to these issues. The seminar aims to define, theorize and critically engage with the growing body of work in this area, including artistic case studies and documentation, critical and theoretical debates, and application of these theories by engaging in an active eco-art project.

ILUS 305 S001R – Illustration Genres: Topic (3)

DRWG 315 S001R – Drawing: The Human Figure (3)

HUMN 311 S090 – Visual Art Seminar (3) Online component HUMN 311 only

 ILUS 305 and DRWG 315 on Mondays, 4:30pm – 7:20pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Daphne Plessner

Topic: The Body

This course is Linked to the online course: HUMN-311-S090 Online: Visual Art Seminar: The Body What is a ‘body’? This course invites students to respond creatively to the differing conceptions and manifestations of a ‘body’, not only human, animal and importantly, non-human beings, but also, other expressions of ‘body’ such as ‘something that ‘embodies or gives concrete reality to a thing’ or as ‘a sensible object in physical space’ or as the ‘denseness, fullness, or firmness of texture’ or the ‘fullness and richness of flavor’ etc. Students will be asked to experiment with various media and produce a portfolio of visual artworks (2D, 3D or performative etc.) that reflects a range of these differing perspectives and complexities of the concept of a ‘body’. Students will also be expected to engage in group discussions, crits and field trips

ILUS 305 S002 - Illustration Genres: Topic (3)

Tuesdays, 12:30pm – 3:20pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Daniel Drennan ElAwar 

Topic: Voice Manifest: strategies for creative liberation

Hamid Dabashi, in his article “Art as the politics of the impossible”, references the Gulf Arab peninsula, its relations with “Western” art economies, as well as its cultural, linguistic, and popular disconnection from the greater Arab world. In this article, Dabashi is discussing the political and economic history of the region. He evokes notions of displacement, migration, and diaspora, and acknowledges a growing sense of alienation. Finally, he suggests a solution to feelings of distance and remove in reconnection, and a reliance on an intuitive inner sense, what we might call a transcendent, aesthetic “gut instinct”. Howard Zinn, in his writing on the U.S. from his book "Artists in Times of War", similarly speaks of history and context as defining parameters of creative output.

Dabashi and Zinn are referring to particular places, but their focus on ideas of identity, place, and creativity are applicable elsewhere if not everywhere. This focus acknowledges concepts of class, dominant cultural modes, as well as their pressures, incentives, and hegemony. In this light, identity becomes functional to the vitality of social engagements and relations on the most-local levels. In contrast to this, global, national, regional, and metropolitan discourses are abstracted toward an oppositional “universality”. They are dismissive of source and local cultures (often for class-based reasons), encourage affected identities, and define distances apart instead of creating and bridging among/between communities.

Such contradictions, mapping quite readily onto very particular economic and political systems/worldviews, provoke a question: How do we manifest creative expression centered not in a notion of one’s self determined extraneously via an alien and alienating realm, but instead via a communally based notion of the historical, political, and economic relationship between source and current place? How might a focus on an expansive material basis of art practice positively change the way we work? In this class, through readings, research, reflection, discussion, writing, and creative expression, students will explore their relationship to places, to land, to language, to audiences, to art, and to the world in an effort to bridge such distances, decolonize, and find creative liberation.

INDD 350 S001M and S002M – Topics in Industrial Design (3)

Tuesdays, 12:30pm-3:20pm 

Instructor: Keith Doyle

Topic: New Craft

Industrial Design is a broad field touching on a wide range of methods, techniques and processes. The discipline itself has its roots in the 18th & 19th centuries – directly linked to emergent mass production, mass industrialization and mechanization. Simultaneously, Arts & Crafts emerged as a political will opposed to this mass industrialization. Over the last half-century, industrial design has evolved as a process integrating traditional crafts (knowledge) and industrial mass-production techniques to emerge as a multi-faceted discipline integrating people, material practice (making), ecological concerns, sustainability, social agency and change.

On the occasion of the 2016 XXIT Triennale di Milano International Exposition, the Fabbrica del Vapore in Milan, Italy, hosted the exhibition New Craft. The exhibition offered a broad view of over 500 manufacturing applications from more than 30 countries around the world. Each exhibit was unique offering a determined view of Craft in the 21st century. We are witnessing a revolution in access to technology that is influencing and transforming our ways of producing, our ways of consuming and above all, our ways of designing. In this course we will reflect on the proposition of a new revolution, one of industry, arts &crafts. We will explore the local and contemporary forms of New Craft through survey, short-lecture, guest speakers and in studio experimentation. 

MDIA 300 S001 – Media Thematic (6)

Mondays, 1:00 pm - 7:20 pm Spring 2019 

Instructor: Julie Andreyev + Simona Overstall

Topic: Media + Sound Ecologies

This course explores ecological creativity by combining methods from media and sound practices—video, acoustic ecology, sound art, performance—and approaches from ecology, new animism, indigenous ways of knowing, ecopoetics, philosophy, and biology. The course invites students to imagine and create projects that expand on ecological and empathetic awareness. The course blends indoor and outdoor work, including field workshops and field work, trips to galleries, technical workshops, seminars, collaborative sessions, discussions, presentations, critiques and work sessions. Perception enhancing workshops that focus on the senses—vision, hearing, touch and proprioception—are designed to generate an expanded understanding of the world. Field sessions engage students in methods of ecological creativity through research and creative responses to local lifeforms and natural systems. The course offers techniques in video and sound field recording, cinematography, soundscape production, and media performance, and supports students who want to integrate material approaches, such as drawing, sculpture, writing, photography, textiles, etc. The course asks students to engage in research and creative assignments on a weekly or biweekly basis, and this knowledge builds towards one self-determined media project. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of ecological creativity as the relationship between their ways of knowing and the lively creative forces of the Earth.

MDIA 300 S002 – Media Thematic (6)

Wednesdays, 8:30am-3:50pm 

Instructor: Christine Stewart + Allison Hrabluik

Topic: Mashups and Pranks
Mashups and Pranks invites students to disrupt and reshape old narratives. Through screenings, seminars, field trips, workshops, critiques and discussions students will investigate alternative methods of storytelling in our contemporary media landscape. We will explore strategies of appropriation and intervention, including found footage, performance, hactivism, activism, the archive, analytics, media archeology, and graffiti. We will also investigate how these strategies exist within conventional filmic structures through alternative script writing and experimentation with genre. Students can complete projects in any media they choose, and are encouraged to use this class as a workshop to expand critical engagement of their own practices. 

MHIS 327 S001 – Studies in Animation History (3)

Tuesdays, 8:30 am – 11:20 am Spring 2019

Instructor: Alla Gaddasik

Topic: Animating the Invisible

For many animation scholars and filmmakers, a defining feature of “animation” (that separates it from traditional photographic film) is the capacity to bring to life processes or concepts that are invisible to the naked eye or the camera. This course takes the notion of “animating the invisible” as an organizing structure for thinking about the history and aesthetics of animation over the last century. The course will consider different ways of thinking about “animating the invisible” through weekly topics that include animating labour, space, race, desire, and other aspects that define our everyday experiences, and yet do not have an optical referent (cannot be actually seen as tangible things). Topics and films are going to cover traditional narrative animation, but will also include experimental animation, scientific and industrial animation, animated documentaries, and other genres that exceed the classical understanding of animation history. Each week’s topic will be accompanied by scholarly readings, which students will be expected to complete, discuss, and write about independently. Assignments will include short weekly assignments and a final curation project. In-class participation skills, independent reading and research skills, and writing skills will all be developed in this course.

MHIS 327 S002 – Studies in Animation History (3)

Thursdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Alla Gaddasik

Topic: Animating the Invisible

For many animation scholars and filmmakers, a defining feature of “animation” (that separates it from traditional photographic film) is the capacity to bring to life processes or concepts that are invisible to the naked eye or the camera. This course takes the notion of “animating the invisible” as an organizing structure for thinking about the history and aesthetics of animation over the last century. The course will consider different ways of thinking about “animating the invisible” through weekly topics that include animating labour, space, race, desire, and other aspects that define our everyday experiences, and yet do not have an optical referent (cannot be actually seen as tangible things). Topics and films are going to cover traditional narrative animation, but will also include experimental animation, scientific and industrial animation, animated documentaries, and other genres that exceed the classical understanding of animation history. Each week’s topic will be accompanied by scholarly readings, which students will be expected to complete, discuss, and write about independently. Assignments will include short weekly assignments and a final curation project. In-class participation skills, independent reading and research skills, and writing skills will all be developed in this course.

MHIS 429 S001 – Topics in Film/Video Theory (3)

Thursdays, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm Spring 2019
Mondays, 8:30 am – 11:20 am Spring 2019

Instructor: Sarah Samash

Topic: Transgressive Gazes across the Americas – Cinema through a women centric lens

By tracing a women centric social, geo-political, cultural, historical, cinematic map, we will be looking at the praxis of key women filmmakers across the Americas. From Alanis Obomsawin, to Arlene Bowman, to Ann Marie Fleming, to Amanda Strong in Canada to Chicana filmmakers in the US (i.e. Lourdes Portillo, Sylvia Morales), to Latin American filmmakers (Marta Rodriguez [Colombia]), Sarah Gomez [Cuba], Patricia Ferreira Yxapy [Brazil], Lucrecia Martel [Argentina]), we will examine the intersectional politics evidenced in their films. This examination will feature discussions grounded in critical approaches to, and analyses of, the historical, theoretical, political, social, economic, and cultural framework of these filmmakers. We will also be revisiting concepts from film theory, such as cult theory and auteur theory, which are traditionally centred around the Euro-Western white male imaginary, in order to subvert, transgress, and redefine film theory from a women and women of colour perspective. By deconstructing some of the dominant, oppressive discourses and colonial systems that provoked the counter-narratives and resistance manifest in various women made cinematic works, our goal is to expand our understanding of film culture.

New course! PRAX 300 – sections and practices are listed below

This third year course offers the opportunity for students to develop their practice within the discourse of contemporary and historical art discourse. Students will acquire a critical vocabulary for understanding their own trajectories in dialogue with the context and history of art, through group critiques, discussions of pertinent writings, and individual and group presentations of research on a variety of subjects related to their area of practice. A Dialogues course is an investigation of artistic practice premised on a student's own interest to situate their work in a broader discourse and professional realm. They will learn skills related to completing projects, making presentations, speaking in public, leading discussions, writing, and integrating research and knowledge within their creative practice. Weekly meetings will allow for critiques of self-directed studio projects, discussion of assigned readings, and presentations of research projects.

PRAX 300 S001H – Dialogues With: Ceramics (6)

Fridays, 8:30am–3:50pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Justin Novak 

Topic: Ceramics

PRAX 300 S002 – Dialogues With: Illustration (6)

Wednesdays, 8:30am–3:50pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Nick Conbere 

Topic: Illustration

PRAX 300 S003 – Dialogues With: Illustration (6)

Wednesdays, 8:30am–3:50pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Daphne Plessner 

Topic: Illustration  

PRAX 300 S004 – Dialogues With: Illustration (6)

Wednesdays, 1:00pm–7:20pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Andrea Heimer 

Topic: Illustration

PRAX 300 S005 – Dialogues With: Painting (6)

Wednesdays, 8:30am–3:50pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Ben Reeves 

Topic: Painting

PRAX 300 S006 – Dialogues With: Photography (6)

Wednesdays, 8:30am–3:50pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Raymond Boisjoly 

Topic: Photography

PRAX 300 S007 – Dialogues With: Print and Book Media (6)

Wednesdays, 8:30am–3:50pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Beth Howe 

Topic: Print

PRAX 300 S008 – Dialogues With: Sculpture and Expanded Practices (6)

Tuesdays, 8:30am–3:20pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: TBA 

Topic: Sculpture and Expanded Practices

PRNT 307 S001 – Print Media Practices: Topic (6)

PNTG 315 S001A – Painting Practices: Topic (6)

Mondays, 1:00pm–7:20pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Rodney Konopaki 

Topic: Monotype

Monotypes are the focus of research for this course. Monotypes, often referred to as "painterly prints", are an approach to making images frequently explored by artists to augment work in other media. Our projects will be completed using both oil and water-based media. Students will use additive and subtractive techniques, stencils and transfers to develop singular images and also to build evolving iterations of these images. This is a production class that encourages students to deeply immerse themselves in their work. We will give equal attention to materials and ideas. There will be frequent discussions about the projects that are underway and each student's development. Studio time, class critiques and tutorial discussion are essential and ongoing activities.

SCIE 300 S001 – Studies in the Sciences (3)

Fridays, 8:30 am – 11:20 am Spring 2019

Instructor: Sanem Guvenc-Salgirli

Topic: Design of Disease

Description: Poisons, pills, corpses, gravediggers, miraculous cures, epidemics, sorcerers... History of medicine is one big ensemble that incorporates all these and more. This strange and varied history is at the same time entangled with various practices of design: from the architecture of medical and mental institutions to early visualizations of diseases and human anatomy, from X- Rays and MRIs to computer generated imagery in films and TV series. Why is history of disease also the history of humanity? Why do we think of pain through metaphors? How can poison be a cure as well? How do representations of diseases affect the way we perceive the world? Through these questions (and many more!) this course is designed to give the students a sneak peak into the history and sociology of medicine through a discussion of a wide range of diseases, treatments, and cures.

SCIE 300 S090 – Studies in the Sciences (3)

Online Spring 2019

Instructor: Jane Slemon

Topic: The Natural Sciences: Heart, Mind, Health: Learning from the Human Body

We'll explore topics related to health and the things that affect it. Looking closely at what’s occurring within aspects of the human biological system, the course invites students to explore health, illness and imbalance as well as approaches to health care treatment as these relate to our other work in art and design. Delving into medical material and shaping thoughtful questions for science, students control the direction of their research and notice how our ways of thinking about the body connect to what we know--our maps, our imaging, our analogies. We look at the many ways the body learns in health and in ill health: the conditions and drugs that affect how nerves and the brain function; conditions of the brain; the effects of procrastination, play and practice; the ways cancer can manifest in tissues; what science has learned about sexual function and dysfunction; how we manage cancer research and bring attention to it in art works; the anatomy and physiology of the heart's systems of muscle, conduction and circulation; how viruses (like AIDS or H3N2) cause the immune system to act against the human host. These special topics invite interest in these and other avenues of research for the student.

SOCS 300 S001 – Studies in the Social Science (3)

Tuesdays, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Rob Stone

Topic: Choreographesis

This course looks at aspects of contemporary art and urbanism through the specific optic of movement: the movement of bodies, the movement of peoples, the movement of images and movements in critical thought. We will connect examples of cinema to dance, visual art, urban planning, protest, travel and so forth in order to see how movement has become such a dominant trope in western culture and in art and film-making more especially since the middle of the twentieth century.

We will look at a set of perceptual figures related both to film and choreography – concerning breath, weight, poise, flight, education, attentiveness, pain, anger, heat, duration, grace, urgency, loathing, failure, laughter, discipline, and so forth. We will bring these into relation with ideas of articulating metaphorical space with the body, as well as by, across, through and against the body.

You will think about and decide how to write from there in what we’ll call a choreographetic manner, and in doing so develop a set of new interpretative conceits for a study of sociability that is appropriate to the requirements of a filmic grammar.

SOCS 300 S002 – Studies in the Social Science (3)

Wednesdays, 8:30 am – 11:20 am Spring 2019

Instructor: Alex Phillips

Topic: Go for the Brain! Zombies in Film and Popular Culture

This course will examine why zombie films have gone from being an obscure horror genre to a widespread cultural phenomenon. How has George Romero’s low budget film: Night of the Living Dead inspired hundreds of imitators, a television series, and an avalanche of undead artifacts such as books, T shirts, video games, and music. Taking an anthropological approach to the zombie craze this course will treat zombie films as cultural documents, looking at their historical roots in primitivism, cannibalism, and the Haitian Voudun religion. It will identify critiques of mainstream society, consumerism, and race and class difference, while examining why the refusal of the dead to stay that way speaks to fears about the restlessness of the deceased. The course will draw on a variety of sources such as Val Lewton’s 1940’s film: I Walked with a Zombie, Wade Davis’s book The Serpent and the Rainbow: A Harvard Scientist’s Astonishing Journey into the Secret World of Haitian Voodoo, Zombies, and Magic, and numerous films such as Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead, comedies, and genre mixes.

SOCS 302 S001 – The Ethics of Representation (3)

Mondays, 4:30 pm – 7:20 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Emel Tastekin

Topic: Whose representation is it anyway? Immigrants and ethnic minorities in contemporary Western imagination

Edward Said’s opening quote for his famous book, Orientalism (1978), misappropriates Karl Marx’s statement, “They cannot represent themselves; they must be represented,” to get across his argument that European scientific knowledge in the nineteenth-century studied the Orient as “the other” from a “position of superiority” for the purpose of “dominating restructuring, and having authority” over it. One way that Said’s observation might still be relevant today is to study how “the other” (or the “subaltern,” according to Spivak) within the West can be represented and how discourses in power might be affecting certain forms of representation. In other words, what are the ethical parameters of representing marginalized and disadvantaged ethnic groups within the democratic West? When does it become cultural appropriation, stereotyping, or a mere show of multiculturalism? What assertive ways of expressing cultural difference have been successful? In this course, we will explore and complicate terms like cultural hegemony, privilege / non-privilege, visible / non-visible minorities, migrancy, and transnationalism through a close reading of theoretical texts, not limited to Said and Spivak, but also from the field of Cultural Studies, with special focus on diasporic identities. We will support these theoretical readings with a wide range of representation/self-representation of migrants and minorities in literature, art, and popular culture. Some of these works will be reactions to racial discrimination and calls for activism. Others, will critique academic and formal representation through creative means. Some will be fulfilling cathartic functions without radically questioning the discourses in power.  We will start by exploring the culture of Black-Caribbean minorities in Britain, as the founding narrative of Cultural Studies pioneered by Stuart Hall. However, our examples will also extend to include Asian-/South-Asian-/Latino-minorities, and Indigenous peoples in North America.

VAST 210 S001T– Visual Art Studio: topics (3)

VAST 310 S003T – Visual Art: Special topics (3)

PHOT 306 S003T – Special Topics in Photography (3)

Thursdays, 12:30pm–3:20pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Raymond Boisjoly  

Topic: Works of Art are Works of Fiction

“Works of Art are Works of Fiction” will draw upon ideas of literary theory in relation to the production of visual art works. Victor Shklovsky’s “Art as Device” (1917) has been a point of reference for understanding art though it is entirely concerned with the literary. Working from this interpretation Shklovsky’s text from the perspective of art, students will conceive of projects that situate art as fictive, something made rather than simply made up. Course work will focus on reading literary fiction to understand potentials for expanded studio practices.

VAST 310 S001B Visual Arts: Special Topics (3)

NMSA 312 S001B Performance Art (3) 

Mondays, 4:30pm – 7:20pm, Spring 2019

Instructor: Peter Bussigel

Topic: Performance Art

This course facilitates a broad skill and technical level for students interested in focusing on or incorporating performance in their work. Through classroom workshops, exercises, readings, and discussion, students gain a thorough understanding of Performance Art and its implications. Students will experience a range of performance practices, some of which engage live audience or public arenas and video and other mediums within a gallery setting. Students develop a concept, thematic/subject area into clear and concise project proposals and public engagement. Students develop informed and critically engaged artworks, experiences or presences, including experimentation with form and sensitivity to social contexts. Students will be required to keep a record of their processes and choices during the production of their work, so that after critique, their methodologies can be shared. This course elucidates performance strategies and supports students exploring performance in relation to their own divergent practices.

WRTG 200 S001 – Creative Writing (3)

Tuesdays, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Art Perry

Topic: Burn, Burn, Burn! : Spontaneity + Improvisation + Experimentation in Sound + Image + Word

Burn, Burn, Burn! : Spontaneity + Improvisation + Experimentation in Sound + Image + Word is a writing studio class. Functioning as a writing workshop, the course offers students a chance to create a body of work and get considerable feedback on their writing. Through a creative curriculum, students will explore various forms of spontaneous, stream of consciousness, and experimental writing in genres such as poetry, fiction, and drama. The course will expand the scope of creative writing by also exploring improvised examples of music (specifically jazz) as well as visual artists who use chance in their work (such as Jackson Pollock, Yves Klein and Louise Bourgeois). Students will be expected to read the two course novels (Jack Kerouac, On The Road and Eimear McBride, A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing) and participate in discussions, complete weekly writing experiments, share their work for critique, and participate in literary and performance events. This course explores the possibilities of language through the freeform styles of improvisation and stream of consciousness writing. Students are encouraged to study books, art and music within their own areas of interest and be willing to share these with the class.

WRTG 401 S001 – Senior Writing Studio (6)

Tuesdays, 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm, 3:50 pm – 6:40 pm Spring 2019

Instructor: Jacqueline Turner

Topic: Writing the City

This course considers the space of the city as a site to explore writing as a material practice. We’ll use structures of the city as potential forms for writing including explorations of social spaces, the development of site-specific practices, and writing en plein air.  Wandering, meandering, venturing out, and other peripatetic approaches are built into the course and provide frames for playful and experimental ways of writing. We’ll read contemporary literary work located in cities to provide the basis for you to build your own interpretations, styles, and techniques. Connections between writing and other visual practices are encouraged. The course culminates in a project of your choice, supported by research, that demonstrates your individually directed intersections between writing the city and your developing creative/writing practice.